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Amid the trolley chaos, pupils enjoy 'hands-on' day at medical college

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Students Sarah Caffrey and Maeve Claffey from Rathdown School watch Clinical Tutor of Ob and Gynae at the Rotunda Hospital and RCSI performing a pregnancy scan on expectant mother Ramona Patton from the Pheonix Park in Dublin at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Open Day

Students Sarah Caffrey and Maeve Claffey from Rathdown School watch Clinical Tutor of Ob and Gynae at the Rotunda Hospital and RCSI performing a pregnancy scan on expectant mother Ramona Patton from the Pheonix Park in Dublin at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Open Day

Students Sarah Caffrey and Maeve Claffey from Rathdown School watch Clinical Tutor of Ob and Gynae at the Rotunda Hospital and RCSI performing a pregnancy scan on expectant mother Ramona Patton from the Pheonix Park in Dublin at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Open Day

Leaving Cert students witnessed 'live' surgery during a visit to the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI).

More than 400 secondary school pupils from around Ireland were given demonstrations on how surgeons, doctors, pharmacists and physiotherapists do their jobs at the annual open day event.

"It was very inter-active. We watched a gall bladder operation 'live' from Beaumont Hospital," said Orla Flanagan (18), a student at Notre Dame Secondary School in Churchtown in Dublin.

"The surgeon was talking to us and he showed us the stomach and liver during the operation. It was really interesting," said Orla, from Rathmines in Dublin.

Her classmate Sondos Siddiqi (17) from Knocklyon in Dublin said a surgeon demonstrated how to mend broken bones using metal plates.

She was first inspired to explore a medical career by stories her uncle told her about being a medical student in Kabul in Afghanistan. Her uncle was unable to finish his medical studies because of the growing violence in the country, she said.

Both Sondos and Orla joined other young visitors at the college in using a virtual reality surgical simulator which is used to give practical instruction to medical students.

Holistic

Professor Arnold Hill said the annual Open Day is always a great opportunity for second level students to learn about the college.

"This year, we have decided to go one better and give a more hands-on experience to students.

"The event will give potential students a more holistic insight into what life really would be like, not just as an RCSI student, but in their career afterwards," he said.

aokeeffe@herald.ie


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