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A woman who was raped in her teens by Ray Teret has labelled him "the Devil's work". Teret groomed her in the 1970s when he lived in a flat above a record shop in south Manchester.

A woman who was raped in her teens by Ray Teret has labelled him "the Devil's work". Teret groomed her in the 1970s when he lived in a flat above a record shop in south Manchester.

The 54-year-old mother said: "He's the devil's work, a child abuser, a paedophile, a sexual predator. When I was 14 I thought he was charming. I thought he was nice. I thought he was my friend.

"He gave me a lot of compliments and made me feel special by picking me out and asking me to do things for him. He put me on a pedestal. He groomed me, basically. He was good at it. He was well practised. He had been doing it his whole life.

"There's no way to punish Ray Teret. I can't give him a new brain to accept he's done wrong, accept he's hurt all these women," she said.

"If he understands that, he would suffer because he would suffer enormous guilt for the rest of his life. But I don't think for one minute that he feels he's done wrong, that he feels he should be punished. The reason I'm doing this publicity thing is because I want the message out there that the powerful aren't going to get away with it any more. Victims should come forward.

"They will get support, they will be listened to. It's time abusers stopped ruining people's lives," the woman added.

She said the ordeal had a lasting affect on her relationships. "It made me feel very sad, very angry and it made me think how different life could have been had it not happened. I felt cheated. He had stolen something from me that should have been taken in better circumstances. He twisted what I thought about sex, about men, about intimate relationships and damaged my thought processes and that's stayed with me for far too long.

"Even though I now realise what's happened, it's difficult to change. Even though I understand, it's difficult. I know there are good men out there but it's very hard for me to trust men.

"I feel fortunate now that I will be able to get on with my life. It hasn't totally destroyed me. I've been able to continue and was strong enough to bring up my children without a man present. I've had a lot of failed relationships.

PLEASED

"When I read that Ray Teret had been arrested and three women had come forward I knew I had to come forward to the police. I felt pleased.

"Initially, I was going to have screens (when I gave evidence in court). I told them to take them down. They advised me not to but I did.

"I was nervous. My legs were shaking. I could hardly stand up when I got in there. My hands were shaking and I had high anxiety. I got to look him in the eye.

"That was important for me. I knew he was there. I tried to look at him in the eye but he wouldn't look at me. He turned away.

"I felt that did empower me. I realised he had everything to fear and I had nothing to fear. I had done nothing wrong. I felt quite strong and that was like a turning point‑."

hnews@herald.ie


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