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Wags to get dose of reality in South Africa for TV

Five 'wags' will ditch the luxury of the footballing world to confront the reality of daily life in South Africa for a new TV show.

In the build-up to this summer's World Cup, the show, provisionally called Wags In South Africa, will see the glamorous women faced with the stark reality of the orphan crisis, HIV pandemic and social breakdown that engulfs the country, the BBC said.

The programme will feature Emile Heskey's partner Chantelle Tagoe, Matthew Upson's partner Ellie Darby, Frank Lampard's ex-partner Elen Rivas, and Amii Grove and Imogen Thomas, the former girlfriends of Jermaine Pennant and Jermaine Defoe.

The show is part of BBC3's winter/spring season, which was launched today.

The new season also sees Hollywood actress Lindsay Lohan investigating child trafficking in India and Girls Aloud's Nicola Roberts probing the world of "tanorexics".

Roberts, known for her "pale and interesting" complexion, will explore the extremes which drive some people to achieve the perfect tan.

What Would You do For A Tan? is part of the channel's Dangerous Pleasures season.

Meanwhile, Lohan travels across India to meet people involved in child trafficking for Lindsay Lohan In India. Those behind the show said the Mean Girls actress will question whether there is any solution to the trade which sees poverty-stricken parents sending their children away to work.

Strictly Come Dancing star Brian Fortuna will choreograph Dancing On Wheels.

The "pioneering" show will see six celebrities, including Mark Foster, Heather Small and Michelle Gayle, paired with six wheelchair users as they compete to represent Britain in the European wheelchair dance championships.

Following the series The Undercover Princes, BBC3 will welcome The Undercover Princesses, who head to Britain in search of their Prince Charming.

BBC3 said it is the most watched channel among 16 to 34-year-olds for the hours it broadcasts, with 4.8 million watching every week.

hnews@herald.ie


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