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My house is so well known in Love/Hate the postman calls me Mrs Nidge

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HOT PROPERTY: Homeowner Anne has had many fans of Nidge, above, and Love/Hate come to take pictures of the house

HOT PROPERTY: Homeowner Anne has had many fans of Nidge, above, and Love/Hate come to take pictures of the house

HOT PROPERTY: Homeowner Anne has had many fans of Nidge, above, and Love/Hate come to take pictures of the house

HER home has become so well known since featuring on RTE's critically-acclaimed drama Love/Hate, the postman calls her "Mrs Nidge".

Fans of the hit show will recognise the house in Castleknock, Dublin as that of none other than the fictional ruthless crimelord King Nidge.

But its real owners are a family of five who offered their home up after receiving a note through their letterbox five years ago.

"I didn't know what it was at the time, but I thought that I'd give it a go," said homeowner Anne. "They also approached one of my other neighbours, but she had just done a wonderful job on her house. I think mine looked worse, so they chose it," she joked.

Ever since then, the programme's cast – including Tom Vaughan Lawlor, who plays Nidge and Peter Coonan, known to viewers as Fran – descend upon the property for around one week every year.

MEMORABLE

The programme's creator and writer Stuart Carolan has avoided film sets as much as possible, instead choosing a number of locations across the city, from the apartment of Darren (Robert Sheehan), which is situated at Tallaght Cross East, to the defunct Noel Leonard's pub on Victoria Quay, used as the offices of dissident republican boss Dano (Jason Barry).

On the use of her house for filming, Anne told the Herald: "They might spend the Monday setting up, and then they might film for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Then on Friday they might be putting everything back together.

"They do bring in their own furniture and fittings, so everything in the programme isn't mine."

Many scenes have been filmed inside the house, including a memorable one in series four when Nidge pulls out his samurai sword and lies in wait beneath a bed after two rival gangsters break into his home.

Anne said: "There's about 40 to 50 people in the house when they're filming and they use one of the bedrooms as a changing room and one for an office – they're all over the house."

As the show's popularity has mushroomed, the number of fans who turn up at the house to take a pictures or witness some of the filming has grown too.

Anne said: "The postman does call me Mrs Nidge. We have people coming up to the door and taking a photo and running away again."

HNEWS@HERALD.IE


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