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Liz Taylor's stunning dress for wedding No1... now it's for sale

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elizabeth taylor.jpg

elizabeth taylor.jpg

US film star Elizabeth Taylor and her first husband Nick Hilton, of the hotelier family, on their wedding day.   (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

US film star Elizabeth Taylor and her first husband Nick Hilton, of the hotelier family, on their wedding day. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

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elizabeth taylor.jpg

The wedding dress worn by film star Elizabeth Taylor for her first marriage to hotel heir Conrad Hilton in 1950 will go up for sale next month, auction house Christie's has announced.

The simple, but elegant garment created by Hollywood costume designer Helen Rose for the then 18-year-old Taylor is an oyster shell-coloured, floor-length satin gown with a fine silk gauze off-the-shoulder illusion neckline.

The dress, which was a gift from MGM film studios, has a top estimate of €60,000. Rose also designed Grace Kelly's wedding dress for her marriage to the Prince of Monaco.

By the time Taylor married Hilton she was already a veteran actress and was just a year away from her Oscar-nominated performance in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's A Place In The Sun.

AUCTION

The A-list of old Hollywood – Greer Garson, Gene Kelly, Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire, Esther Williams, and Van Johnson – were among the many stars who came to congratulate the bride. The star of Cleopatra surpassed Michael Jackson as the highest-earning deceased celebrity in a survey released by Forbes in October 2012, with her estate pulling in $210m, much of it from a 2011 auction of jewels, costumes and art work.

The auction of Taylor's jewels took in $116m, more than double the record for a single collection, and set new marks for pearls, colourless diamonds and Indian jewels.

Taylor, who died in 2011 at the age of 79, was married eight times, twice to actor Richard Burton.

She first gained fame in 1944's National Velvet at age 12, and was nominated for five Oscars, winning best actress for Butterfield 8 (1960) and Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? (1966).

hnews@herald.ie


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