independent

Wednesday 18 July 2018

Drone survey explores secrets of medieval Glascarrig village

The earthen mound would be the moat, which would have had a wooden castle on top, and the rest of the area would have been the medieval village
The earthen mound would be the moat, which would have had a wooden castle on top, and the rest of the area would have been the medieval village
Historian Joey Donohoe, archaeologist Byron James and landowner Gary Murphy

Sara Gahan

A local man is promoting a campaign to highlight the issues surrounding erosion at a former Anglo-Norman Medieval village site in Glascarrig.

Byron James from Gorey, and his research team, have conducted a drone survey of the archaeological site under the Cherish Project, which is led by Sandra Henry. They have released the results of the project so far, which includes various photos and surveys.

This was done to get update shots of the site. The images will be used to try and spot archaeological features in the ground which are only visible from the air. More surveys will be done in the next few years to see how erosion of the site is advancing, using the latest survey as a comparison.

Glascarrig Medieval Village Research Project, along with Cherish Project, aim to discover more about this once important site on the Wexford coastline. Byron said it has given a few secrets in terms of artefact finds and in 2019 a geophysical survey will be conducted in order to find the archaeological sites of streets, houses, ditches and pits.

'This will no doubt give us a clue to the lay out of the settlement and an insight into the lives of the people in Medieval Glascarrig,' said Bryon.

The Medieval Village dates back to 1190s and included a moat, wooden castle, a Bailey (farmstead and pens), port of Ferns town, a village of 48 houses, and medieval priory.

Byron said it may have been built by one Raymond le Gros, who was the first Norman landlord at Glascarrig and leader of the second Anglo-Norman expedition to Ireland via Baginbun in South Wexford.

The settlement at Glascarrig led a short, colourful life as a major Norman settlement. The Cauntetons rebelled against local authorities, who were based in Wexford town, and eventually it was burned to the ground by local Irish in 1311. Its inhabitants, mainly Welsh and some English, fled back across sea leaving the village to never fully recover.

Gorey Guardian

News