independent

Saturday 17 August 2019

St Senan's pupils turn spotlight on technology overload in new movie

Boys and girls who took part in the Movie Making at St Senan’s PS, at the premier of their movie ‘Technology Overload’ with co-ordinator Gearóid McCauley
Boys and girls who took part in the Movie Making at St Senan’s PS, at the premier of their movie ‘Technology Overload’ with co-ordinator Gearóid McCauley

Simon Bourke

Tasked with creating an original movie as part of their filmmaking course, the children at St Senan's Primary School chose to focus on one of the biggest issues of our time.

Entitled 'Technology Overload' their original six-minute film showcased the dangers of the Internet in an informative and considered manner. Co-ordinator, Gearóid McCauley, explained both the premise and the process involved.

'The film begins with the children coming to school and using their screens, their tablets and phones. On the way in one girl is mean to one of her classmates. The pupils then discover their teacher is a witch and she zaps them into the Internet. The mean girl ends up with the Kardashians, which she initially thinks is great, but then they're mean to her. Some children go to the jungle, others a volcano, but ultimately they must come together and defeat the evil witch. It ends with them realising they're better off without the Internet.'

Taking over a month to film, edit and produce, Technology Overload premièred at a special screening in the school last week, one which was attended by the filmmakers, their parents and friends.

And, according to Gearóid, the experience has benefited the pupils in both an academic and creative sense.

'The great thing about filmmaking is it integrates with English, Science, History and a range of other subjects, the children use all of their knowledge and skills while at the same time being creative.

'They come up with the ideas, my role is to simply act as facilitator. It was a child-centric project which hopefully encourage them to do more in the future,' he said.

Enniscorthy Guardian

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