independent

Monday 20 August 2018

Let's kick the habit of unrealistic resolutions

For your new year’s resolution, rather than going cold turkey on the treats, wouldn’t it be worthwhile to take on something new rather than depriving ourselves?
For your new year’s resolution, rather than going cold turkey on the treats, wouldn’t it be worthwhile to take on something new rather than depriving ourselves?

Deborah Coleman - Straight Talking

It's the new year and here we all are, in the words of Oprah 'living our best life'.

The resolutions have been made, goals have been set and now all we have to do is stick to them.

While we lounge about over Christmas with a tub of Quality Street in one hand and a glass of wine in the other, we look ahead to January with a sense of hope, excited to see the new and improved versions of ourselves that it will be oh so easy to become.

There is a lot of indulgence over the festive season so at the time it seems easy to imagine that we will glide into our new and healthier routines with aplomb.

Whatever we decide to change, be it diet, exercise, reducing stress, achieving a goal which before seemed out of our reach - January is the time to go for it.

The new year always brings a sense of a new beginning and a fresh start and this, for many of us feels good. Any failed resolutions can be written off in favour of a better and more disciplined approach and we know that 'this time' we won't fail.

Every new year starts with a broad consensus that getting fit and losing a few pounds is the best way to improve oneself and yes, it is a great start.

However, if we look beyond ourselves as individuals and the usual resolutions maybe we could achieve much more in our communities.

The reason so many of us fail is because we are on a solo run but if we work together then we are more likely to inspire one another.

Rather than going cold turkey on the treats, wouldn't it be worthwhile to take on something new rather than always giving up and depriving ourselves?

It's a bit like Lent - those who pledge to do something positive each day for themselves and others gain far more from the experience than simply giving up the odd treat for 40 days.

Similarly in January, if we decided to start the year being kinder to ourselves and making the most of every day rather than simply making it through to the end of another filled full of pressure and deprivation then wouldn't we have achieved more?

We would be far more likely to keep this up rather than a fad diet or a gruelling fitness regime, and be much happier for it, therefore avoiding the all too familiar February failure that tends to follow our unrealistic resolutions.

Enniscorthy Guardian

News