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Spectacular shots of Aurora Borealis taken from the Martello Tower in Balbriggan

Spectacular shots of aurora borealis taken from Balbriggan

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A photograph of Aurora Borealis – otherwise known as the Northern Lights – taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower by local astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes.

A photograph of Aurora Borealis – otherwise known as the Northern Lights – taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower by local astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes.

A photograph of Aurora Borealis – otherwise known as the Northern Lights – taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower by local astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes.

A photograph of Aurora Borealis – otherwise known as the Northern Lights – taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower by local astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes.

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A photograph of Aurora Borealis – otherwise known as the Northern Lights – taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower by local astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes.

fingalindependent

Stunning pictures of the Northern Lights taken from Balbriggan’s Martello Tower have appeared in the windows of the Our Balbriggan Hub on George’s Square.

The photos of the Aurora Borealis were taken by Balbriggan astronomer and photographer Carl O’Beirnes, earlier this moth.

“It was amazing to get the shots – it was totally clear and there was no moon, which is one in a million in this country!” Carl said.

“It was my first time ever seeing it. I used a regular SLR camera with a lens and a six second exposure on it.

“The solar storm pushed the lights towards us, which is unusual – the last time it was visible in Ireland was in 1999.”

On the night in question, using a website which tracks space weather, Carl knew to be out with his camera.

“They were only there for a few minutes each time. When I first went down, it was happening and then it faded off but we were keeping an eye on the website so I knew it would come back again,” he said.

The Northern Lights are caused by the meeting of particles from the sun and the earth’s atmosphere.

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Our planet’s magnetic field both protects humanity from the particles and redirects them toward the North Pole.

Carl is well known for his work at Balbriggan Observatory and Planetarium, which helps locals to see the wonders of the night sky, conditions permitting.

Unfortunately, that has had to take a back seat during Covid, but he is looking forward to re-opening it when the pandemic eases.

“It would be irresponsible to put people in at the moment, and that’s why we stopped.

“There is nowhere to social distance inside a planetarium, but as soon as it is possible, we will open again,” he said.

Carl’s pictures are stunning, as you can see in this week’s Fingal Independent and the shots quite literally show Balbriggan in a whole new light!


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