Dublin

| 24.6°C Dublin

Rush legend Eoin Morgan hangs up his England bat

Close

Eoin Morgan pictured with the winners' trophy after the Ireland v England One-Day International in Malahide in 2019. Photo by Sam Barnes/Sportsfile

Eoin Morgan pictured with the winners' trophy after the Ireland v England One-Day International in Malahide in 2019. Photo by Sam Barnes/Sportsfile

Eoin Morgan pictured with the winners' trophy after the Ireland v England One-Day International in Malahide in 2019. Photo by Sam Barnes/Sportsfile

fingalindependent

FINGAL’S finest cricketer of all time Eoin Morgan has confirmed his retirement from the international game.

England’s World Cup-winning captain (35), who was born in Ballyboughal and started his cricket career with Rush, became Ireland’s youngest senior international back in 2006 but switched allegiances three years later in order to pursue his dream of playing at Test level.

In a statement released on Tuesday afternoon, Morgan said: "To call time on what has been without doubt the most enjoyable and rewarding chapter of my career hasn't been an easy decision, but I believe now is the right time to do so, both for me, personally, and for both England white-ball sides I have led to this point.

"I am hugely proud of what I have achieved as a player and captain, but the things I will cherish and remember the most are the memories I made with some of the greatest people I know along the way.

"I have been lucky enough to play in two World Cup-winning teams, but I believe the future for England's white-ball teams is brighter than ever. We have more experience, more strength and more depth than ever before. I look forward to watching on with a huge level of excitement."

Morgan said he "will continue to enjoy playing at a domestic level while I can".

The left-handed batsman played 16 Test matches for England, scoring two centuries, but was unable to cement a place in the five-day side and went on to be seen as a limited-overs specialist.

He became captain after Alastair Cook was sacked on the eve of the 2015 World Cup, helped usher in a new generation of players and established England as a world force in the limited-overs formats. That culminated in a sensational victory over New Zealand in the 2019 World Cup Final which Morgan himself described as ‘the greatest game ever played’.

He had hoped to play in the Twenty20 World Cup in Australia this October but has been struggling for form and fitness. He led a one-day series in the Netherlands this month but failed to score a run in two innings and missed the concluding game with a groin problem.

Nevertheless, Morgan will leave a considerable legacy as a player – he retires as England’s record one-day and T20 scorer with 6,957 and 2,458 runs respectively – and will be regarded as one of his adopted country’s greatest leaders.

Dublin Eye Newsletter

Dublin news for Dubs everywhere. Find out what’s going on in the nation’s capital. Issued every Friday.

This field is required


Privacy