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Large number of buildings ‘at significant flooding risk’ from Dublin’s Camac river

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The 55km-long River Camac flows through a number of areas in south Dublin

The 55km-long River Camac flows through a number of areas in south Dublin

The 55km-long River Camac flows through a number of areas in south Dublin

A study is under way to assess options for a flood alleviation scheme around the River Camac in south Dublin.

The river, approximately 55km long, flows from its source near Saggart Hill in the Dublin Mountains through Clondalkin, Walkinstown, Drimnagh, Inchicore and Kilmainham, before entering the Liffey at Heuston Station.

According to the project steering group, which includes South Dublin County Council and Dublin City Council, a large number of buildings within the Camac’s catchment have been identified as being at “significant flooding risk”.

Consultant engineers AECOM Ireland have been appointed to undertake preliminary design for the scheme, which falls within the responsibility of the two Dublin local authorities.

A number of public consultation events will place this week as part of a “high-priority” study, where draft flood maps and information on alleviation options will be available.

The project team describe the Camac as “a heavily urbanised watercourse, which brings particular challenges, both for flood risk management and environmentally, especially in light of climate change”.

The catchment study covers a large area and includes the River Camac itself, its tributaries and the pipes that feed it.

Possible options may include the creation of new flood plain areas, channel capacity improvements, culvert upgrades and the raising of banks via walls or embankments.

The Office of Public Works are the funding authority and technical advisors for the Camac Flood Alleviation Scheme.

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