independent

Thursday 13 December 2018

History talk on Slane architecture

Architecture is based on three elements - strength, commodity and light, ie how the structure is built, the building must be able to be used for the purpose for which it was built, and it must be a pleasing experience, explained Mr Dargan.In the 1760s a new town plan was laid out for Slane adjacent to earlier medieval settlement. It was laid out in a cross shaped

SLANE’S architecture is unique with its outstanding example of four Georgian houses situated in the centre of the village, outlined Pat Dargan, lecturer in physical planning and design at DIT, at the recent lecture organised by Slane Historical and Archaeological Society.

‘Architecture is based on three elements - strength, commodity and light, ie how the structure is built, the building must be able to be used for the purpose for which it was built, and it must be a pleasing experience,’ explained Mr Dargan.

In the 1760s a new town plan was laid out for Slane adjacent to earlier medieval settlement. It was laid out in a cross shaped plan at the junction of the roads from Drogheda to Dublin. It developed as an estate village following the building of the castle, firstly with farmers trading their produce at the market square (where the traffic lights stand).

Then came the tradespeople with blacksmiths, bakers, etc. setting up along the main street between the square and the castle gates having leased out plots from Viscount Conyngham. The generation of the village was compared with similar ones around Ireland, such as Mountbellew.

Buildings became more solid with four matching cut limestone Georgian houses at the square and the addition of a row of mock Victorian on Main Street.



Next talk takes place on Wednesday April 20 at 8pm in The Conyngham Arms Hotel, Slane.

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