independent

Tuesday 16 July 2019

Rededication of Nadd monument

Local men Tadhg Lyons, Seamus Sexton, Michael Leonard Snr and Michael Sexton Jnr pictured at the Nadd republican monument. Photo: Catherine Ketch
Local men Tadhg Lyons, Seamus Sexton, Michael Leonard Snr and Michael Sexton Jnr pictured at the Nadd republican monument. Photo: Catherine Ketch

A CEREMONY in Nadd next week will commemorate four local men who died in 1921 during the War of Independence.

The ceremony marks restoration of a monument by locals in conjunction with a group dedicated to republican monuments in Cork City and County.

The Captain Timothy Kennefick Commemoration Committee recently restored the monument along with local people. The Committee aims to honour Irish patriots by restoring and returning republican monuments to the care of their local communities.

The Boggeragh Mountains above Nadd village was the location of a republican training camp and became the scene of a huge British roundup in 1921.

In late Feb 1921 Liam Lynch, commandant of the Cork No. 2 Brigade of the IRA, was forced by British activity in Lombardstown to move his brigade further west into the area of Nadd. A training camp had been operating there for some months and David Herlihy's farmhouse had become known as 'the barracks'. The Mallow and Kanturk columns were dispersed among local farmhouses.

In March, British forces staged a major round-up. A party of British soldiers arrived unobserved to David Herlihy's house where Herlihy, Lieutenant Edward Waters of Mallow Company, volunteers Timothy Kiely, Joseph Morgan and John Moloney were all sleeping, and were captured.

They were all taken out the back to a field by the British soldiers and told to run. Morgan and Moloney dashed for liberty, both were wounded but escaped into the cover of the mountains. Waters, Kiely and Herlihy, however, were shot dead and bayoneted.

Separately, Edward Twomey of Lacklown Company, a cow testing inspector who was at work, was shot dead running across a field.

"Our sole aim is to honour our patriot dead and to look after and care for the monuments," says Tony Mccarthy, committee member. He explained that their aim is to get the local people to take ownership of the monument and to care for them.

"We firmly believe that no group or party owns the monuments. They belong to all the people of our country," Mr Mccarthy said explaining that the committee is a-political.

The committee has also found where all four men who died in the Nadd Ambush are buried. Michael Kiely is buried in Aghabullogue, Eamon Waters in Newbury, Mallow and Dave Herlihy and Edmond Twomey are both interred in Lyre.

The re-dedication ceremony takes place on March 11 at 3pm, and all are welcome to attend.

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