independent

Wednesday 22 May 2019

Davis College pupils scoop national awards

Micheál Lawlor, deputy principal, Davis College, Stephen Gilbert, school principal; award winning students Eoin Healy and Lilian Anoruo; Colette O’Callaghan, economics teacher and José Horta acting deputy principal, Davis College
Micheál Lawlor, deputy principal, Davis College, Stephen Gilbert, school principal; award winning students Eoin Healy and Lilian Anoruo; Colette O’Callaghan, economics teacher and José Horta acting deputy principal, Davis College

Bill Browne

Brainy young boffins from Mallow's Davis College have picked up a clutch of awards in a national competition aimed at nurturing the talents of the next generation of Irish financial wizards. 

Run by the Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST) the annual Young Economist of the Year competition encourages second-level students to compile detailed projects on issues of economic impact. 

Now in its fifth year, the 2019 competition attracted more than 1,000 entries, double that of last year, with the standard of entry extremely high. 

Davis College performed remarkably well in this year's competition, with six students invited to attended last Thursday's national finals at University College Dublin. 

Transition Year student Lilian Amorou struck gold with her outstanding project that investigated the impact of 'fast fashion' on the global retail sector, with the study placed second overall in the country in the TY category. 

The trio of Ana Koehler, Donnacha Wallace and Eoin Healy all picked up silver for their investigations focussing on issues from the economic impact of climate change to how positivity can impact on workplace productivity. 

Eoin also won the 'Sustainable Development Goals' award beating off stiff competition from a field of exceptionally impressive entries. 

Fifth year pupil Emily O'Sullivan and TY student Raquel Garcia both won bronze awards for their respective studies into the economic impact of the atomic bomb on the city of Nagasaki and how the 'K pop' music genre is impacting the South Korean economy.

Corkman

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