Cork

| 6.3°C Dublin

Cork and Kerry bear the brunt of Storm Barra: Wind gust of terrifying 156km/h recorded off coast

Close

High tide in Cork this morning (Photo: Cork City Council)

High tide in Cork this morning (Photo: Cork City Council)

High tide in Cork this morning (Photo: Cork City Council)

THE fury of Storm Barra reached such a pitch in Cork that a wind gust of a terrifying 156kmh was recorded off the west Cork coast.

Cork Co Council confirmed that wind gusts have now exceeded the initial Met Éireann warning of 140kmh - with debris being scattered in some areas like missiles.

The wind gust of 156kmh was recorded at the height of the storm at the Fastnet Lighthouse off west Cork.

A second gust of 113kmh was recorded at Sherkin Island.

This is Cork Newsletter

Cork's essential reads in local news and sport, straight to your inbox every week

This field is required

The council pleaded with people to adhere to the Status Red alert until 9pm this evening and remain safely indoors.

Close

Myrtleville, Cork. er Thun Gemini taking shelter during Storm Barra off the coast at Myrtleville, Co. Cork. Picture; David Creedon

Myrtleville, Cork. er Thun Gemini taking shelter during Storm Barra off the coast at Myrtleville, Co. Cork. Picture; David Creedon

An early morning visitor records the weather conditions at the onset of Storm Barra at Myrtleville, Co. Cork. Picture; David Creedon

An early morning visitor records the weather conditions at the onset of Storm Barra at Myrtleville, Co. Cork. Picture; David Creedon

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf  Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf  Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Clontarf Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Storm Barra scenes pictured in Howth Harbour Dublin today. Pic Stephen Collins/ Collins Photos Dublin

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

Waves overtop a wall on the road to Youghal, Co. Cork as storm Barra bears down on Ireland. Photo: Damien Storan.

A woman tries to avoid sea spray, whipped up by the wind and waves on New Brighton promenade. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

A woman tries to avoid sea spray, whipped up by the wind and waves on New Brighton promenade. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Car parks closed along the seafront at Clontarf ahead of the anticipated Storm Barra.
Photo by Steve Humphreys

Car parks closed along the seafront at Clontarf ahead of the anticipated Storm Barra. Photo by Steve Humphreys

Workers clearing trees outside Our Lady of Consolation National School, Collins Avenue in Dublin as Storm Barra travels across the country.
Photo: Mark Condren

Workers clearing trees outside Our Lady of Consolation National School, Collins Avenue in Dublin as Storm Barra travels across the country. Photo: Mark Condren

A woman walking on Collins Avenue in Dublin as Storm Barra travels across the country.
Pic:Mark Condren

A woman walking on Collins Avenue in Dublin as Storm Barra travels across the country. Pic:Mark Condren

Workers clearing trees outside Our Lady of Consolation National School, Collins Avenue in Dublin as storm Storm Barra travels across the country.
Pic:Mark Condren

Workers clearing trees outside Our Lady of Consolation National School, Collins Avenue in Dublin as storm Storm Barra travels across the country. Pic:Mark Condren

Members of the Kerry Branch of the Civil Defence spent most of Monday in their Tralee HQ getting sand bags getting equipment sorted for the Red weather warning. Pictured is Alan Hanafin Civil Defence Officer and John Fitzgerald Commander . 
Photo By : Domnick Walsh ©  Eye Focus LTD ©

Members of the Kerry Branch of the Civil Defence spent most of Monday in their Tralee HQ getting sand bags getting equipment sorted for the Red weather warning. Pictured is Alan Hanafin Civil Defence Officer and John Fitzgerald Commander . Photo By : Domnick Walsh © Eye Focus LTD ©

Members of the Kerry Branch of the Civil Defence spent most of Monday in their Tralee HQ getting sand bags getting equipment sorted for the Red weather warning dur too hit parts of Kerry and parts of the west coast . Pictured Pat Shortt . 
Photo By : Domnick Walsh ©  Eye Focus LTD ©

Members of the Kerry Branch of the Civil Defence spent most of Monday in their Tralee HQ getting sand bags getting equipment sorted for the Red weather warning dur too hit parts of Kerry and parts of the west coast . Pictured Pat Shortt . Photo By : Domnick Walsh © Eye Focus LTD ©

/

Myrtleville, Cork. er Thun Gemini taking shelter during Storm Barra off the coast at Myrtleville, Co. Cork. Picture; David Creedon

Met Éireann warned people not to be lulled into complacency by the wind momentarily easing - with wind lulls quickly followed by damaging and dangerous gusts.

Cork and Kerry have borne the early brunt of Storm Barra though Clare, the south east and east will face damaging winds over Tuesday afternoon.

Virtually the entire Irish, French, Spanish and UK fishing fleets fled to Cork and Kerry ports ahead of Storm Barra such was the fear of its raging winds.

The wind gusts have resulted in fallen trees causing power outages and flooding hitting coastal towns and blocking numerous roads.

Cork city avoided major flood damage despite the tidal surge resulting in numerous low-lying city quays being flooded.

The worst flooding occurred in county towns including Bantry, Midleton and Youghal.

Worst hit was Bantry where a one metre storm surge swept over the sea wall and overwhelmed local flood defence systems.

Such was the scale of the flooding that gardaí had to close Bantry town square and Bantry Fire Brigade and Cork Co Council crew deployed emergency pumps.

Cork Co Council senior engineer John Donegan said the storm surge reached around one metre - and swept over parts of the town's sea wall, culvert and temporary defense systems.

"There was a period of spring tide with a coastal surge of up to one metre - the sea wall was overtopped and the culvert that runs through the centre of the town has been surcharged."

Around 23 properties around the town square were hit by flooding as a result though again major damage was avoided.

In a gesture of thanks to the local emergency services, Bantry's Maritime Hotel provided breakfasts for first responders when the flooding had cleared.

Another Bantry premises, Organico, provided hot drinks and snacks to the emergency services as a gesture of thanks.

Bantry Yarns was one premises flooded but luckily major damage was avoided to both stock and fixtures.

"Glad to say there was only very minor flooding in the shop after the big tidal surge," a shop spokesperson said.

Cork South West TD Christopher O'Sullivan warned that the incident underlined that the new flood relief scheme proposed for Bantry "cannot begin quickly enough."

Councillor Danny Collins said the flooding was "quite bad" but paid tribute to council staff, contractors, Gardaí and Bantry fire brigade officials who worked throughout the night to avert more serious damage.

"Thank God the council water pumps were deployed on Monday evening and it really seems to have worked. Because while 23 premises were impacted, it could have been a lot worse to be quite honest."

River levels were also being monitored with flood barriers erected in both Mallow and Fermoy.

Torrential rainfall which came with Storm Barra will leave numerous Cork and Kerry towns on flood alert for the next 72 hours.

Flooding also occurred on the Back Street in Youghal which later receded as well as parts of Midleton town centre.

The council said it had numerous reports of roads flooded throughout the county.

Numerous trees were reported to have fallen across Cork with several roads blocked in west Cork and Cork city.

Power outages have been reported in west and north Cork and parts of Cork city.

Cork's city quays flooded from 7am due to the combination of a powerful storm surge, torrential rainfall and spring tides.

While there was major surface water on Morrison's Island, Fr Mathew Quay and even Oliver Plunkett Street and the South Mall, the initial reports were that there was no major damage to residential or commercial properties.

Motorists and pedestrians were urged to avoid the city quays due to surface water and flooding.

There were reports of flying debris in the city centre near Liberty Street with slates and plaster dislodged by the powerful winds.

Cork City Council's David Joyce said a major factor in ensuring the flooding didn't cause further damage was the manner in which the Status Red alert was observed with the overwhelming majority of people staying home.

Meanwhile, in the south-west, Kerry County Council and the Kerry Severe Weather Coordination Team are very strongly reminding members of the public to remain indoors this afternoon and not to travel due to the extremely dangerous and hazardous conditions caused by Storm Barra continue to worsen.

The council is advising that wind speeds will increase significantly over the coming hours as the storm reaches its peak.

The Kerry Severe Weather Coordination Team – including Kerry County Council, the HSE, An Garda Síochána, Kerry Fire Service and Kerry Civil Defence – continues to coordinate the response to the storm and reminds everyone that a Status RED weather warning, the highest such warning, remains in place for Kerry.

There are a significant number of roads closed or blocked by fallen trees, fallen electricity poles and flooding. Council crews will only be able to respond to issues when it is safe to do so.

Members of the public should not, under any circumstances approach fallen trees or fallen power lines.

Trees are down and blocking (or partially blocking) roads at the N70 Tralee to Castlemaine Road (near hairpin bends), at the N70 Farmers Bridge road, at the N21 Near O’Riada’s Bar, at the N71 Port Road, Killarney, at the N69 Cahirdown, at the R523 Athea road and at the N70 Carhan, Cahersiveen.

Trees are also down in on N71 at Gortamullen and on the Roughty Road in Kenmare. There is also a Tree down 3km west of Killaha on Castletownbere Road. There have been further reports of trees down on Loughguittane National Schoool and at Brookhill in Kilgobnet.

The N71 road in Kenmare at the Suspension Bridge is impassable as is the pier road.

An outdoor dining area has also been damaged at the back of the Arbutus Hotel in Killarney in the Fair Field Car Park due to gale force winds.

There are some power outages across the county including in Milltown which is affecting more than 2,000 customers and in Castleisland which is affecting more than 300 customers.

There is also an outage at Killarney at Coolcorcoran which has affected more than 80 customers, Gurranebane in Waterville which has affected more than 100 customers as well as minor power outages in Kilgarvan and Kenmare.


Related topics


Privacy