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Bweeing remembers War of Independence hero Kiely

Teenager Kiely was slain on March 10, 1921 in the famous Inchemay round-up. To mark the untimely death of Kiely, a special committee drawn from Nadd, Bweeing, Donoughmore and Glantane convened to commemorate a true Irishman on the construction of a wall and concreting the entrance to Kielys home place.One of those at the helm, Tim Looney expressed delight at the respons

Teenager Kiely was slain on March 10, 1921 in the famous Inchemay round-up. To mark the untimely death of Kiely, a special committee drawn from Nadd, Bweeing, Donoughmore and Glantane convened to commemorate a true Irishman on the construction of a wall and concreting the entrance to Kiely’s home place.

One of those at the helm, Tim Looney expressed delight at the response to commemoration. “I mooted the idea of remembering Michael Kiely about seven years ago but it was only in the past 12 months that the project came to reality. Its delightful to see it come to fruitition and such a large attendance at the commemoration,” said Mr Looney.

Those involved in the organising committee included Ted Meaney, Seán Kelly, Tim Looney, Pat Cremin, Patrick and Brian Looney, Patrick Fleming, Paddy Casey, Matt Healy and Sonny Mulcahy.

Funding for the wall and concreting surfaced from funding from IRD Duhallow, the sale of a poem titled “Inshamay” composed by Jack Jamsie Cremin and voluntary subscription.

Jack Roche expressed delight on his presence to honour and remember Michael Kiely for the price he paid to achieve political independence that Ireland enjoys today.

The actions of young Kiely and his colleagues surfaced at the height of the War of Independence. Leader Liam Lynch had made his headquarters in the mountainous region of Nadd.

During early March to 1921, a number of significant events saw the British forces ambushed at Clonbanin and an attack on the RIC at Fr.Murphy’s Bridge.

Plans were afoot for the blowing up of Rathcoole Bridge and preventing the British from occupying the Mills at Dromagh. Safe homes in remote Nadd played host to the Irish forces and on March 9, Dave Herlihy’s house at Inchemay opened its doors for Michael Kiely, Ned Waters, Jo Morgan and Congo Maloney.

Leader Liam Lynch had sent a despatch to burn the mills at Dromagh while another group headed to burn the bridge at Rathcoole Bridge.

However, a mole related the whereabouts of the key Irish figures to the British at their headquarters in Kanturk.

Though the rain fell and the dense fog descended over the mountainous Nadd region, the Black and Tans converged on Inchemay and headed to Dave Herlihy’s home.

The door was unlocked to allow those involved in the Dromagh Mill ambush the option to return during the night where much of their arms lay. The occupants were surprised, arrested and terrogated. Subsequently, they were requested to run before the Tans opened fire with Herlihy, Ned Waters and Michael Kiely shot dead. Though Congo Maloney and Joe Morgan were wounded, they escaped in the fog.



85 years on, a representative and large attendance saluted the extraordinary pursuits of the young Bweeing man Michael Kiely in championing the cause of national idealism.