independent

Thursday 18 July 2019

Keelan remembered in 2019 tournament

Allison McKibban from Meningitis Research Foundation meeting with Keelan’s friends for the cheque presentation. Keelan’s friends helped organise the event and played on the day
Allison McKibban from Meningitis Research Foundation meeting with Keelan’s friends for the cheque presentation. Keelan’s friends helped organise the event and played on the day

Mary Fogarty

The annual Keelan O'Connor Cup raised a total of €1,348 for the Meningitis Research Foundation.

The tournament was held in memory of much-loved Bray teenager Keelan, who was just 15 when he sadly died of meningitis in September 2015.

The tournament and family-fun day took place in Little Bray Community Centre last April, and this was its fourth year running. More was raised this year than any other.

60 players competed in the tournament, ranging in age from 16 to 20 years old. A raffle, cake sale, face-painting, bouncy castle and games added to the incredible family-fun atmosphere on the day.

The happy winner of first prize in the raffle brought home a signed Ireland jersey, whilst second prize offered two Premium-level tickets for an Ireland game.

Connect - Bray Youth Neighbourhood Project (BYNP) Coordinator Yvonne Murray organised the event along with the dedicated support of Keelan's childhood friends, who proudly played on the day. The Sports Promotion Unit generously volunteered to referee the games, with Keelan's step-father Johno Keane stepping in to help referee the final game of the day.

In an incredible show of community spirit, supporters gathered together to make the event a success, with volunteers baking for the sale, arranging games, face painting and donating to the raffle.

Meningitis Research Foundation is a leading Irish, UK and international charity working to defeat meningitis wherever it exists. They fund and support vital scientific research. They campaign and provide information to the public, health professionals and researchers that promotes prevention, early diagnosis and treatment, and raises awareness of the diseases. They also provide direct support and ongoing personal help to individuals and families affected, whether they are living with impairment caused by the diseases or coping with the death of a loved one.

Bray People

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