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Scoil Phádraig Naofa celebrate Brigid's Cross-making tradition

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Carrie Craig Hay, Zoe Dowdall, Lisa Marie Casey, Isabella Houssaye, Leah Reilly, Briege Casey, Faye Ward (Back row): Aoibheann Reilly, Zoe Tracey and Niamh Laurance with their crosses

Carrie Craig Hay, Zoe Dowdall, Lisa Marie Casey, Isabella Houssaye, Leah Reilly, Briege Casey, Faye Ward (Back row): Aoibheann Reilly, Zoe Tracey and Niamh Laurance with their crosses

Carrie Craig Hay, Zoe Dowdall, Lisa Marie Casey, Isabella Houssaye, Leah Reilly, Briege Casey, Faye Ward (Back row): Aoibheann Reilly, Zoe Tracey and Niamh Laurance with their crosses

Scoil Phádraig Naofa, Kilcurry celebrated a long held school tradition, making St. Brigid's Crosses, ahead of the February 1st Feast of St. Brigid.

The school is situated in the heart of Faughart Parish, and cross making has been a tradition in the area and local schools for many, many decades.

Some staff members even remember making them in school when Teddy Lambe was principal, a tradition continued by Frank Short and current principal, Kevina Goss.

In January 2020, Scoil Phádraig Naofa, Kilcurry continued the tradition of St. Brigid's Cross making in the school, with mass on Friday last, where staff and pupils attended mass and the crosses were blessed.

SNA Briege Casey assisted by SNA Breda Marmion organised the preparation of rushes and teaching the children how to make the crosses.

Deputy Principal, Mrs. Sinead Callan and Fifth Class were also delighted to welcome Una Casey into the school last week to participate and speak to the fifth class children about her own school days.

Principal Ms. Ross said: 'The school is very grateful to Michael Conlon for supplying the school with rushes, which are short in supply this year.'

She explained: 'There are many legends and stories about St Brigid. Perhaps the best loved one tells of the day she visited a pagan chieftain, who was dying. The chieftain had no wish to see Brigid, and he wouldn't speak to her. Brigid, however, stayed by his bed and took care of him. The floor of the room was covered with fresh rushes, and Brigid took a handful of these and began to weave a cross.'

The story, which pupils have been learning in the school told old man was asked to become a Christian before his death

'To this day, a cross of rushes - a St. Brigid's Cross - are hung in many Irish homes on the first day of February, which is St. Brigid's Day.'

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