independent

Thursday 18 October 2018

Think re-useable nappies

Gill and James Toal with Joanne Redpath, Carlingford Tidy Towns and Aisling Sheridan, Louth County Council at the launch of the ‘Not all Nappies are Rubbish’ campaign during the ‘Cooley Parent and Toddler Group’ Hallowe’en meeting.
Gill and James Toal with Joanne Redpath, Carlingford Tidy Towns and Aisling Sheridan, Louth County Council at the launch of the ‘Not all Nappies are Rubbish’ campaign during the ‘Cooley Parent and Toddler Group’ Hallowe’en meeting.
Hannele and Ollie Daly at the launch of the ‘Not all Nappies are Rubbish’ campaign during the ‘Cooley Parent and Toddler Group’ .

'Cooley Parent and Toddler Group' was the apt setting for the launch of the 'Not all Nappies are Rubbish' campaign.

With a range of reusable nappies that would put the old terylene options to shame, there wasn't a pin or a bucket of bleach in sight, as the parents and children got the chance to sample the state-of-the-art variety that was provided by Carlingford Tidy Towns on the day.

This initiative allows parents to borrow a wide variety of reusable nappies, of all shapes and sizes. This gives them the chance to experience first-hand, what these new brands have to offer and how they are streets ahead, in terms of cost and convenience, than the more widely used disposable variety, which clogs up our waste bins and landfill sites.

Disposable nappies are huge contributors to the volume of household waste produced in Ireland. It is estimated the one baby creates 2.5 tonnes of nappy waste in just 2 years. For a family with one baby, half of a typical waste bin will consist of disposable nappies, each one of which will take up to 500 years to biodegrade.

With the wide range of reusable variety now available, the main obstacles to their widespread use remain a lack of user information, limited back-up support to deal with queries, in addition to the outlay associated with their initial purchase.

Considering the huge contribution nappies make to household waste, in addition to the lack of information and knowledge out there, Carlingford Tidy Towns have taken the first steps to address the issue, with the introduction of a 'Cloth Nappy Library'.

Using funding provided by Louth County Council, through the Local Agenda 21 Environmental Partnership Fund, a full range of cloth nappies will be available for a trial period, completely free of charge, to enable parents to try them out and establish what might suit them best.

Anyone with queries, or who would like to sign up for the trial, are welcome to contact Carlingford Tidy Towns directly through their Facebook page.

The Argus

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