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‘Women can try to sell me nappies and wipes on my timeline all day long; I don’t mind. But don’t make motherhood, and mothers themselves, the product’

Ellen Coyne


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We like relatable women, and brands have noticed

We like relatable women, and brands have noticed

We like relatable women, and brands have noticed

I see women at their lowest all the time. A front-facing camera invites me into a low-lit room where a woman with greasy hair and a stained bathrobe holds back tears as a baby clutches her breast. A mirror selfie in a stranger’s bathroom documents a postpartum breakdown, and the caption beneath a seemingly idyllic portrait of a mother and child reveals that it was actually taken at a time when this woman felt her worst.

We’re blessed to be benefiting from an era of refreshing candour in the world of mam influencers, where high-profile women are generous enough to make themselves vulnerable to a mass audience in the spirit of helping others. The old days, when we were only shown the carefully curated highs of motherhood, are all but banished, and we’re all the better for having heard more about the physically and emotionally gruelling lows.


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