Thursday 16 August 2018

No touching please, but are we losing a grip on our humanity?

Society is becoming more touch-averse and the future doesn't look too embracing, writes Niamh Horan

MODERN ROMANCE: Today the gentle brush of a person’s arm or a hand on their back, whether flirtatious or platonic, is withheld for fear of the consequences, following the #metoo campaign. Stock picture
MODERN ROMANCE: Today the gentle brush of a person’s arm or a hand on their back, whether flirtatious or platonic, is withheld for fear of the consequences, following the #metoo campaign. Stock picture
Niamh Horan

Niamh Horan

In the 1960s, one of the world's most controversial scientists, Harry Harlow, wanted to find out how important love and affection are to a person's well-being.

He took new-born baby rhesus monkeys straight from their mothers' arms and raised them with a pseudo-monkey made of coarse, hard wire. He then stuck a bottle of milk in the gauze.

The monkeys' basic needs were met. They were safe, dry and fed. Yet, within weeks, they were rocking back and forth, having turned into quivering, pining wrecks.

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