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We know the real reason for rejecting Finucane inquiry

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Katherine Finucane, with her brother John and mother Geraldine at the office of Finucane Toner in Belfast before speaking to the media. Pat Finucane's son John said the failure of the British Government to establish a public inquiry into his death was 'insulting'. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

Katherine Finucane, with her brother John and mother Geraldine at the office of Finucane Toner in Belfast before speaking to the media. Pat Finucane's son John said the failure of the British Government to establish a public inquiry into his death was 'insulting'. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

Katherine Finucane, with her brother John and mother Geraldine at the office of Finucane Toner in Belfast before speaking to the media. Pat Finucane's son John said the failure of the British Government to establish a public inquiry into his death was 'insulting'. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

The Murder of Pat Finucane and the reluctance of the British Government to order an enquiry as in the words of |Lord Denning the enquiry might result in that “ an appalling vista that every sensible person would say it cannot be right that these actions should go any further “

The appalling vista would be that the British Army and or other sections of British Intelligence might as the investigation proceeded be linked to or carried out the murder of Pat Finucane

It is interesting that our Taoiseach has not written to the Speaker of The House of Commons as did the leader of the North of Ireland do in the case of an utterance stupidly by a Sinn Fein member of the Dail concerning a fact that happened

Perhaps our Taoiseach was taking care not to offend his coalition partner whose founding father W T Cosgrave uttered the following statement concerning Partition: “ It is a dam good bargain in his description of the 1925 tripartite agreement which copper-fastened Partition “

Hugh Duffy

Cleggan Co Galway

It’s time Trump looked at the numbers and saw the light

Given that there is almost 7,000,000 votes between Joe Biden and President Donald Trump, one can only hope the latter will , soon , see the light. Not that there is much evidence he has any interest in the damage his foolishness his actions are having on his country.

David Ryan

Co. Meath

Sinn Féin comments could end up costing us millions

Sinn Fein could benefit from a few economic lessons. We are attempting to attract English visitors to boost our tourist industry.

Every shopper in England is free to choose non-Irish products in shops and supermarkets. We could pay a high price for generating bad customer relations.

There is no doubt that his comments come from the heart and reveal the true Sinn Fein. Other political parties should take note. It could also indicate that the peace process cannot be taken for granted. He could be stating that the gun can always return in certain situations.

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Brian Patrick McArdle

Newbridge

Co Kildare

We may as well get used to UK’s over-the-top remarks

“In years to come, we will remember this moment as the day the UK led humanity’s charge against this disease” part of a tweet by Alok Sharma MP Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy in announcing the deployment, next week, of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in the UK.

Somewhat over the top, I suggest, based on his government’s remarkably poor management of the pandemic to date, the fact that it was Turkish-Germans who developed the vaccine and the Belgians who are making it.

Another communication, in the ‘Rule Britannia’ vernacular that we may as well get used to as the UK seeks to shelter its faltering self esteem in the glories of its past, pitiful in many ways.

Michael Gannon,

St. Thomas’ Sq,

Kilkenny.

Deal or no deal is irrelevant – port logjams are inevitable

I have to take issue with your editorial of Wednesday 2nd December. You state that “…failure to get a deal would cause logjams at borders”. After having done a number of Brexit/Customs courses I think I can clarify a misconception. Deal or no deal is irrelevant to the extent there will be customs declarations, there will be queueing at customs posts and delays in supply chains after Brexit. That is unavoidable and is a statement of fact. The UK has left the Single Market and the Customs Union since January 2020 and that departure alone of itself requires mandatory border checks, customs clearance and potential tariffs after the transition period ends. There will be no negotiating out of those obligations regardless of what is agreed between the EU/UK. The eventual deal may eliminate or minimise the worst impacts of tariffs but it will not mitigate the requirement for customs clearance, supply chain delays and gargantuan paperwork. Be under no illusion, Brexit is a seminal moment in European trade and the effects will be immediately visible on 1st January.

On the bright side I have to commend the shipping lines for commissioning the three largest RoRo ferries in the world specifically to avoid the UK landbridge. Indeed, there has also been intensive efforts through the Irish Revenue, Enterprise Ireland and regional LEOs to train Irish business community on Customs procedures.

Frank Buckley

Tullamore


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