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Ukraine war is painful proof we’ve yet to learn the lessons of history

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The global community has not learned from the Holocaust, Cambodian and Armenian genocides, the Palestinian Nakba (pictured) and Srebrenica yet. Picture Palestine Return Centre

The global community has not learned from the Holocaust, Cambodian and Armenian genocides, the Palestinian Nakba (pictured) and Srebrenica yet. Picture Palestine Return Centre

The global community has not learned from the Holocaust, Cambodian and Armenian genocides, the Palestinian Nakba (pictured) and Srebrenica yet. Picture Palestine Return Centre

International justice must be served for the hapless and powerless victims of the merciless aggression in Ukraine. In war, there are no winners, only losers. The main losers are the innocent people compelled to endure mass atrocities, mass trauma, mass destruction and desolation and deep physical and psychological wounds.

This will be remembered as one of the darkest chapters in modern times.

Alas, the global community has not learnt the lessons of the Holocaust, the Cambodian and Armenian genocides, the Palestinian Nakba and Srebrenica yet.

Dr Munjed Farid Al Qutob

London, United Kingdom

Ireland’s ambivalence to monarchy has deep roots

With the passing of Queen Elizabeth II, the world is at a point of reflection with respect to its attitude to the English monarchy.

In recent days the words “affinity” and “attachment” have been bandied about extensively here in Canada.  However, while the Irish might be respectful, if one excludes Northern Ireland, there seems to be very little affinity to the English monarchy.

So let’s take a very brief step back in time to the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

History has always taught us that many of the Irish supported William and many supported James. In reality,  James had very little support in Ireland.

That is one of the main reasons he did not win the Battle of the Boyne.

The relevance of James’s defeat was only parlayed in the mid-1700s, possibly in and around the Battle of Culloden (1746).

In all honesty, one needs to think about this. Imagine if there was a conflict in the English monarchy today. I would suspect the last place on the plane that either side would go for support would be to Ireland. It was no different in 1690.

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Gerard Walsh

Ontario, Canada

A blind man can see where ‘open energy markets’ lead

What a strange fiscal system we operate. The Tánaiste tells us on one RTÉ news show that the ESB is owned by the people and excess profits will be used to alleviate stratospheric bills beginning to drop through letterboxes across the country.

The collective relief was short-lived; the CEO of the ESB appeared on the following RTÉ news programme telling us the profits the ESB makes on the generating side of its business cannot be used to reduce the charges on the supply side.

This of course is a case of the market being skewed to accommodate the disastrous plan to outsource supply.

When the Government was talking about implementing its plan to “open up the energy market”, the warning that conditions that apply in Ireland would not easily accommodate such a convulsed application of capitalism, fell on deaf ears.

A blind man on a galloping horse can see that we haven’t seen the end of the misery that this perplexing set-up is going to cause.

If you think the housing crisis is a disaster, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

No matter how bad things are, it seems this Government can always make them worse.

Jim O’Sullivan

Rathedmond, Sligo

For the sake of the country leave Donohoe where he is

Ireland is now sitting at the head of the table in economic affairs in Europe given that our Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe is President of the Eurogroup, elected to it in July 2022. But Micheál Martin seems determined to undermine Ireland’s influence here to facilitate party politics and agreements made when going into coalition in June 2020, i.e. to change the person holding the finance minister’s role for his own man when the party changeover occurs.

European economic affairs have advanced beyond any inter-party agreements made in Ireland during the time of the Coalition, and the good of the country should come before any one party’s lust for power. A way needs to be found to leave Paschal Donohoe in his position in Europe because if the holder of the finance minister’s position is changed in Ireland, we lose the Eurogroup presidency.

I am not a member of any political party, nor have I any political axe to grind. I am only interested in what is in the best interest of our country.

Des Butler

Julianstown, Co Louth

A Wee question: where are all the newspaper comic strips?

Dennis Fitzgerald laments the dropping of comic strips by his local newspaper (‘Why take away this last bastion of daily humour?’ Letters, September 16).

I completely agree with him, as laughs are indeed in short supply in these somewhat humourless times.

I must away now however, to catch up on the adventures of Curly Wee.

Tom Gilsenan,

Dublin 9


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