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SF will remain a threat until it adopts vision for the future

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'Until Sinn Féin adopts a positive role in Irish politics, with a vision for the future that omits mirrors to the past, it will be a threat to democracy' (stock photo)

'Until Sinn Féin adopts a positive role in Irish politics, with a vision for the future that omits mirrors to the past, it will be a threat to democracy' (stock photo)

'Until Sinn Féin adopts a positive role in Irish politics, with a vision for the future that omits mirrors to the past, it will be a threat to democracy' (stock photo)

Dan O’Brien (Irish Independent, February 6) is quite right to call out Sinn Féin as being a real threat to democracy in Ireland.

The tragedy for Sinn Féin is that it does have genuine republicans in its midst throughout the land. Alas, this merely serves to illustrate that there are indeed faceless people in the background dictating to the party’s democratically elected councillors, TDs and senators.

But the greatest difficulty for many members of Sinn Féin, who were involved in the armed struggle, is that they cannot let go of the past – and I don’t mean since Burntollet. They retain a hatred for people long dead, as well as the systems they imposed on Ireland, under British rule.

Surely, the time has come to work towards an Ireland where all can live in a democratic, peaceful society. Otherwise, a united Ireland will be pie in the sky for generations to come.

There are many unknown challenges facing the world at this moment, from global warming to the outbreak of the coronavirus – a virus that could well have devastating effects on world health and wealth.

With all respect to those who involved themselves in the ‘armed struggle’ for 30 years: you acted freely, knowingly and willingly as a volunteer. Ergo, you do not have the authority, moral or legal, to retain arms or a private army since the peace agreement was brokered.

There were more than enough canards in Irish politics in the 26 counties between 1923 and 1981: the people of today are not interested in continual historic negativity.

Until Sinn Féin adopts a positive role in Irish politics, with a vision for the future that omits mirrors to the past, it will be a threat to democracy.

Life is meant to be a loving joy. Hatred serves no place in life, nor in the heart and mind of a loving person.

Declan Foley

Berwick, Australia

 

Younger voters should brush up on recent Irish history

Your editorial (Irish Independent, February 5) paints a clear and unambiguous picture for voters. It should be heeded by all right-thinking adults. I would like to add that it shouldn’t really be necessary for brave women like Breege Quinn, Esther Uzell, Ann McCabe, the McCartney sisters and Máiría Cahill to hammer home the sheer inhumanity of the Sinn Féin party machine.

The mounting evidence supporting the women’s stories has been circulating for many years, yet we see from recent polls a surge in support for the Sinn Féin party.

What makes the excuses offered by that party’s spokespeople more acceptable or palatable to some than the outrageous treatment these women endured at the hands of so-called “republicans”?

There is still time for students and younger voters to brush up on their knowledge of recent Irish history.

There’s no mystery attached to it. The facts are well documented. Do these prospective voters really believe the party’s economic policy of slash, spend and punish wealthy taxpayers while also promising to build 100,000 social and affordable homes?

For its next trick, it will resolve the pensions crisis by doing nothing.

Our country’s future and the wellbeing of our inexperienced young are at stake.

Bad weather or not, go out and vote, and take our country back into safe keeping for future generations.

Niall Ginty

Killester, Dublin 5

 

Surge in polls can’t hide fact Sinn Féin keeps apologising

For as long as I can remember, Sinn Fein has consistently been in the position whereby it needs to apologise for horrible stuff it knows about. Some things never change, surges or otherwise.

Robert Sullivan

Bantry, Co Cork

 

Women voting for women would change Dáil forever

Ita O’Kelly declares ‘politics is more or less a man’s world’ (Irish Independent, February 3). That she has a point is hard to contradict since the background is that the Dáil is nearly 80pc male.

Despite being a majority in the electorate, women politicians in the Dáil have been very few since independence. That it is not an issue in this election also tells its own story.

The answer to the problem that we have a Dáil that is nearly 80pc male is simple.

Because they are a majority in the electorate all women have to do is vote for women in the upcoming election.

Voting for women irrespective of party would introduce a more fundamental change to the Dáil than voting for a particular party.

Having more women in the Dáil would not only allow women to challenge the male domination, it would allow them to influence decisions in what is the most powerful decision-making forum in our democracy.

A Leavy

Sutton, Dublin 13

Irish Independent