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Protesters should aim their fire at the UN - not statues

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The Civil War Monument statue is strapped on the back of a flatbed tow truck after it was toppled from its pedestal in front of the State Capitol in Denver, Colorado. AP Photo/David Zalubowski

The Civil War Monument statue is strapped on the back of a flatbed tow truck after it was toppled from its pedestal in front of the State Capitol in Denver, Colorado. AP Photo/David Zalubowski

AP

The Civil War Monument statue is strapped on the back of a flatbed tow truck after it was toppled from its pedestal in front of the State Capitol in Denver, Colorado. AP Photo/David Zalubowski

I think the statues should be left alone.

Everywhere.

They are like the Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie to Berlin, though there’s little of each left.

They are artefacts from history that are in our midst.

It’s way better, way more interesting to have them.

It’s also a mark of maturity to leave them alone, that has been sadly absent from much of what has happened in terms of the recent protests.

Some of the violence has been horrific, and doesn’t get the same attention from the media.

It will incur a further exodus away from the mainstream media (MSM).

That anecdote about casting the first stone if you’re blameless remains relevant.

The ire of the protesters should be directed at the UN.

It’s an organisation which seems to champion anything other than having an overarching guideline that countries have an affordable path to a third-level qualification.

It should be about affirming countries and high quality within countries.

Anything else is self-aggrandisement and of deep concern.

Patrick Dillon

Address with editor

 

Cancer screening must be a priority as restrictions ease

People will be able to go for a pint and a bite to eat on Monday coming.

Yet thousands of our citizens cannot go for bowel or cervical cancer screening.

What does that say of our society?

It is despicable. The worry and stress of it.

Paul Doran

Dublin 22

 

Road safety laws apply to cyclists as well as car drivers

I notice a lot of advertisements from the Road Safety Authority recently advising motorists that when overtaking cyclists they should keep at least one metre away from the cyclists when the speed limit is under 50kmh, and 1.5 metres away when the speed limit is greater than 50kmh.

However, I don’t see any advertisement advising cyclists to keep one metre away from pedestrians when zooming past them at 30kmh on a footpath, passing within inches of the pedestrians and not even ringing their bells to warn the pedestrians of their approach.

After all “what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander”.

Martin Heneghan

Dublin 3

 

Trump’s rally in face of virus shows his contempt for voters

US president Donald Trump’s latest actions regarding his campaign rally in Tulsa where he claimed that some 800,000 voters would attend is very troublesome, to say the least.

Tulsa officials warned of the Covid-19 dangers and said that such a huge turnout could possibly end in a catastrophic spread of the dreaded disease.

Trump doesn’t care.

He’s only interested in numbers that make him look great.

People don’t exist except when he’s searching for someone to blame for his failures.

Lies, misinformation and hateful rhetoric are his traits, but he’ll deny it.

It is imperative that American voters must vote him and his corrupt administration out of office on November 3.

Otherwise we will endure four more years of chaos fuelled by his cheering and encouraging against virtually everything we hold dear.

Herb Stark

Mooresville, North Carolina

 

Health should now be central to all government policies

I concur with the gist of your editorial that people should be on their guard and mindful of the coronavirus (“Vigilance will be necessary to keep coronavirus at bay”, Irish Independent, June 24).

This is an opportunity to relieve stress; ameliorate our defence systems against infections; maintain healthy diets and lifestyles; adopt regular physical activity to lower our risk for serious health conditions; and avoid smoking, drug misuse and sedentary behaviours.

In a nutshell, the policy makers should blend health in all policies.

A holistic and integrated approach would allow people to reach their potential for health, reduce health disparities and promote community inclusiveness and support.

Dr Munjed Farid Al Qutob

London, UK

Irish Independent