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Politically mature electorate is unafraid of real change

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'The Irish people seem to becoming more politically mature and unafraid of change, just as it has already shown their social maturity and inclusivity by its recent acceptance of marriage equality and the repeal of the Eighth Amendment' (stock photo)

'The Irish people seem to becoming more politically mature and unafraid of change, just as it has already shown their social maturity and inclusivity by its recent acceptance of marriage equality and the repeal of the Eighth Amendment' (stock photo)

'The Irish people seem to becoming more politically mature and unafraid of change, just as it has already shown their social maturity and inclusivity by its recent acceptance of marriage equality and the repeal of the Eighth Amendment' (stock photo)

Political change is in the offing as the ‘Irish Times’/Ipsos MRBI poll suggests.

What is most welcome is that this probable political change, unlike so many other European and world electorates, is not a swing to the political right with all its exclusivity and closed borders.

The Irish people seem to becoming more politically mature and unafraid of change, just as it has already shown their social maturity and inclusivity by its recent acceptance of marriage equality and the repeal of the Eighth Amendment.

Brendan Butler

Malahide, Co Dublin

 

About time big two parties saw SF bad old days are past

With just days before the first historic Saturday election, I feel Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil need a big dose of reality medicine to cure their Sinn Féin flu.

Both parties are consistently saying that they will not go into government with Sinn Féin, even though opinion polls have the party riding sky high before the big decision day.

Thankfully in a modern, progressive Ireland the electorate – especially the youth of the country – realise the military wing of the Sinn Féin party has long flown away since the sad, bad days of the past.

They are not falling for the constant peddling by Varadkar and Martin at every opportunity in this election campaign that Sinn Féin is soft on crime.

Which is a bit rich coming from parties responsible for closing down many Garda stations right across the State.

It is without doubt now, with Boris Johnson’s full-steam ahead Brexit and his throwing the DUP in a ditch, that his main concern is the future of mainland Britain.

He clearly prefers a lukewarm, watered down union with Northern Ireland  – which suggests that a united Ireland edges ever closer.

When the dust settles after this election, the country will have to endure at least a two-month penalty shoot-out to decide who lifts the Leinster House Trophy.

I certainly don’t rule out another love-in between Varadkar and Martin to share the political powerbase, as you cannot fit a fag paper between the two parties when it comes to policy, which will mean nothing changes and nothing improves for the majority in the country.

Brendan Buffini

Whitebrook, Co Wexford

 

Who needs facts when there is an opinion poll to run?

A topical tale.

Many years ago a leading US pollster published the findings of their latest research at which those versed in such matters pointed out the findings were in direct conflict with long established facts.

The pollsters came back with the glorious and disparaging response to this: “We are not going to be dictated to by a bunch of fact checkers!”

Brendan Casserly

Bishopstown, Co Cork

 

In Mayo, we’d rather have All Ireland to ourselves

The Fianna Fáil slogan ‘An Ireland For All’ prompts me to suggest that the people of Mayo would settle simply for ... an All Ireland.

Tom Gilsenan

Dublin 9

 

Unless voters learn from past we’ll have another calamity

Looking at the opinion polls, it seems we are going to vote for the same policies which bankrupted the country in the pre-2010 period.

Should we not learn from our experience of the 2010 economic calamity and its consequences?

If we do not learn from the mistakes of the past then we are condemned to repeat them.

A Leavy

Sutton, Dublin 13

 

Some badly needed words of wisdom before the election

I’m a little worried about Saturday’s General Election.

A few words from Mahatma Gandhi for that particular day are as follows: “The future depends on what you do today.”

Brian Mc Devitt

Glenties, Co Donegal

 

Our politicians have failed the hospital building test

The Chinese built a hospital in 10 days.

It took our Government more than 10 years to decide where to build one – many would argue that they still got it wrong!

And €2.5bn later most of these experts will be looking for our vote on Saturday while spoofing that they are the party to trust with our economy!

Seamus McLoughlin

Keshcarrigan, Co Leitrim

Irish Independent