Tuesday 15 October 2019

Letters to the Editor: 'Weaker sterling is driving us into UK’s hands on car sales'

'Used imports have been tipped to overtake new car sales here this year. The average contribution to the Exchequer on a new car is €8,500 and, according to Nissan’s CEO, these used imports have cost the Irish Exchequer €1bn in tax over the last four years' (stock photo)
'Used imports have been tipped to overtake new car sales here this year. The average contribution to the Exchequer on a new car is €8,500 and, according to Nissan’s CEO, these used imports have cost the Irish Exchequer €1bn in tax over the last four years' (stock photo)
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

The Irish Independent reports that there is a huge surge in used car imports from the UK due to the probability of Brexit and the current differential between sterling and the euro.

Used imports have been tipped to overtake new car sales here this year. The average contribution to the Exchequer on a new car is €8,500 and, according to Nissan’s CEO, these used imports have cost the Irish Exchequer €1bn in tax over the last four years. 

In addition, from an environmental perspective, we are facilitating the UK in dumping used cars here.

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And if this divergence between sterling and the euro continues, the proposed minimum alcohol pricing will be responsible for huge streams of Northern-bound shoppers to avail of cheap alcohol.

At the moment Gibraltar, although not within the customs union, is a member of the EU and will leave with the UK. There is a strict customs collection point at the border with Spain for goods above very stringent limits. Fines starting at €600 per minor offence are quite common, and double for each year they remain unpaid.

Hugh Duffy

Cleggan, Co Galway

Dubs’ monopoly is a black card for the hopes of the rest

THE headings on the pages of newspapers proclaim Dublin’s record ninth provincial title in a row. That, together with media proclaiming the possibility they will win five in a row in the All Ireland championship, is symptomatic of the lack of awareness of the danger to the future of the amateur status of the GAA the present Dublin situation poses.

The GAA is based on the ideal of people playing for their local area and county, no matter how successful or unsuccessful the area or county is. The present situation, however, sees an area of the country comprising four counties – Dublin City, Dún Laoghaire, South Dublin and Fingal – with a population of 1.3 million and access to almost limitless resources winning nine Leinster championships in a row and going for another All Ireland that would make it five in a row. Because of its access to almost limitless resources, Dublin does not qualify under the heading amateur any more. If the GAA is to maintain its amateur status it has to follow at a minimum the convention that each county has a team. That’s four teams in the Dublin area. Each would be among the top counties in terms of population.

A Leavy

Sutton, Dublin 13

Digging up scandal in Boris’s private life plumbs the depths

VERY far be it from me to leap to the defence of the arch ‘spoofer’ Boris Johnson, but what business is it of anyone’s that he had a row with his girlfriend? I think it was particularly mean-spirited of the neighbours to tape the fracas and pass it to the newspapers.

If Johnson makes PM he has a job to do for the British people. His private life should remain just that…private. When I hire a plumber to fix my pipes I care not a whit about his ‘personal situation’. I do care deeply about his ability to manage the complexities of a faulty cistern. I hope and suspect the British people will adopt the same principle vis a vis Mr Johnson.

Gerry Barrett

Sandyford, Dublin 16

Expressing outrage at abuses of the past is hypocritical

THERE has been a great deal of justifiable outrage expressed as a result of the treatment meted out to former garda Majella Moynihan.

Much of the comment has focused on the apparent cosy relationship between gardaí and the Catholic Church, particularly on sexual and moral issues. Almost everybody agrees that dark period of Irish history has been consigned to the past. But current events tell a different story. According to Social Democrat TD Róisín Shortall, the State is awaiting approvals from the Vatican before the new National Maternity Hospital can be handed over to State control. Just two weeks ago, during the RTÉ documentary ‘Divorcing God’, we learned that a diocesan adviser monitors the teaching of sex education in Athenry Presentation College and reports his findings to the local bishop.

At the same school a religious teacher candidly admitted that sex education is only taught because of a directive from the Department of Education. She went on to give an example of how the school flagrantly contradicts this State directive: “I remind my students that this is a Catholic school and as a Catholic, you do not use contraceptives.”

So, as outpourings of outrage fill the air about the oppressive religious culture of decades ago, we are currently appealing to a foreign theocratic state for permission to open a maternity hospital and instructing our children, on the brink of adulthood, not to use contraceptives. Again, we are witnessing a strain of hypocrisy unique to Irish culture that expresses outrage about religious abuses so long as they are safely buried in the past while tolerating current abuses.

Anthony Sheridan

Cobh, Co Cork

Irish Independent

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