Wednesday 17 July 2019

Letters to the Editor: 'Racist acts take scourge of flag-burning to a new low'

'The burning of Irish Tricolours has become such an integral element in Orange Order and loyalist culture that it does not even warrant comment in much of the media anymore.' Photo: PA Wire
'The burning of Irish Tricolours has become such an integral element in Orange Order and loyalist culture that it does not even warrant comment in much of the media anymore.' Photo: PA Wire
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

The emergence of pictures of two DUP councillors posing for photographs as the Irish national flag was burned on a bonfire in Portadown suggests that nationalists in the North may be in for another sectarian marching season. Surely it is long past time that the Orange Order and the DUP ceased closing their eyes and turning their backs on the actions of those associated with July 12 bonfires?

The burning of Irish Tricolours has become such an integral element in Orange Order and loyalist culture that it does not even warrant comment in much of the media anymore. However, we are now confronted by sinister new developments in sectarianism. Effigies of the late deputy first minister Martin McGuinness in a coffin are now incinerated alongside Polish national flags. Those responsible should be prosecuted for hate crimes.

These appalling acts of sectarianism and racism are new lows even by the standards of ‘normal’ July 12 Orange Order celebrations.

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Nowhere else in Europe would the ceremonial burning of many hundreds of the national flags of peaceful neighbouring states go virtually unchallenged. What if every Bastille Day the Union Jack was burned across France, or if on St George’s Day the flags of Pakistan, Jamaica or Nigeria were burned in British cities? Understandably, there would be harsh diplomatic protests and perhaps riots in the streets.

Tom Cooper

Dublin 6

EU plays hardball over trade deal by using subsidy threat

‘EU chiefs have blocked a £5.4m funding subsidy for the Irish fishing industry in a bitter row over punitive regulations for trawlermen.’

I very much doubt this is actually about fishing – it is blackmail.

‘EU split: Ireland threatens to reject new Brussels trade deal which took 20 years to agree.’

Just wait and see – if the Irish Government caves in and accepts the trade deal with South America, the EU will find a way to reinstate the subsidy.

Result – the EU gets to import low-cost Argentinian beef at zero tariff, and Irish beef farmers and the Irish economy will be paying the price for evermore.

In other words a win-win for the EU and lose-lose for Ireland.

E A Brown

Fife, Scotland

Lawyers should be held to account on insurance claims

Congratulations to all your journalists for highlighting the issue of high insurance payouts.

It is a blight on our lives which is causing serious problems for businesses large and small.

One of your reporters recently made a very valid point. “When a claimant succeeds they receive a one-off windfall, however their solicitors and barristers receive a windfall for every case, sometimes multiple cases per day.”

As a claims manager for more than 30 years I am still shocked at the number of frivolous claims with very often inaccurate information. They do not do their due diligence.

It’s all designed to keep the very expensive meter running, with some €350m paid to lawyers in personal injury cases in 2018.

Keep up the good work but expose the lawyers more.

Name, address with editor

Many still paying the price over housing losses under FF

In 2007, a friend of mine thought she was doing the right thing buying onto the property ladder, acquiring a modest two-bedroom for €525,000.

Bertie Ahern had assured the public that houses weren’t overpriced.

When economists tried to warn people like my friend to exhibit caution, the then-Taoiseach suggested the doom-sayers should “go commit suicide”.

Since then my friend was forced to sell and lost €330,000.

She still owes a significant amount of that money.

Fianna Fáil is delusional if it forgets its own behaviour.

It is delusional if it thinks that people who lost a lifetime’s worth of savings because of its actions, should not still be angry.

Pauline Bleach

New South Wales, Australia

Flower power makes our neighbourhoods bloom

Wild flowers planted in Herbert Park, Dublin, are as pretty as a picture.

One does not have to travel far to view the bright beauty and abundance captured in Claude Monet’s ‘Poppy Fields near Argenteuil’.

Eve Parnell

Dublin 8

Irish Independent

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