Saturday 19 October 2019

Letters to the Editor: 'Brexit propaganda for a bygone age on big screen'

'The well-dressed servants know their place and never are they happier than being in that place (downstairs), doffing their caps to their most fair and decent masters (upstairs).' Photo: Focus Features and Universal Pictures International
'The well-dressed servants know their place and never are they happier than being in that place (downstairs), doffing their caps to their most fair and decent masters (upstairs).' Photo: Focus Features and Universal Pictures International
Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Having seen the film ‘Downton Abbey’ last week (for research purposes, you understand) it strikes me that the film is actually a soft-soap advert for Britain to return to a rose-tinted bucolic (Etonian) version of pre-war Britain.

The well-dressed servants know their place and never are they happier than being in that place (downstairs), doffing their caps to their most fair and decent masters (upstairs).

They fight over who will serve the king and queen, who are stopping off at Downton.

One of them, Daisy, a kitchen maid, declares to the cook that she has just realised she is truly happy. They all look healthy with no stresses other than your usual emotional problems.

Only the Irish actor, Susan Lynch, gives us a whiff of her authentic characterisation of an angry servant – she’s stealing from them upstairs and is unapologetic about it, saying how unfair life is in their position. Of course the directors make sure we don’t like her one bit.

The token Irishman has married up in the family, gone from chauffeur to toff, and he saves the day in preventing a republican’s plot to kill the king.

He’s a good British gentleman now.

Meanwhile, upstairs, the pressure is on – can they keep the aristocratic show on the road?

They are getting a whiff that servants may not be servants for much longer.

But the film ends in soft focus, their position as lords and ladies of the manor affirmed by the housemistress telling her ladyship that Downton Abbey must go on, it is the lifeblood and heart of the community, providing all the jobs and community they would ever need. Sigh.

It is out-and-out saccharine-laced propaganda for Brexit. God help us all.

Alison Hackett

Crosthwaite Park East, Dún Laoghaire, Co Dublin

 

Wind power not reliable? No worries, we’ve gone nuclear

The announcement of a 700MW electricity interconnector from France is simply an admission by the Government that its plan to rely more and more on wind power is going to mean a lack of reliable electricity supply.

Therefore we turn to France for a reliable supply from its mainly nuclear-generated electricity.

Patrick Davis

Dublin 17

 

Céad míle fáilte – or maybe not in Oughterard any more

The international reputation of Ireland as a welcoming land towards the stranger has been irreparably damaged by the recent Oughterard events.

Asylum seekers and refugees will undoubtedly interpret this sad saga and regard Ireland as a country to be avoided at all costs.

Brendan Butler

Malahide, Co Dublin

 

Let’s enjoy our successes – and let’s do it together

It was somewhat depressing to read Ewan MacKenna’s piece: “This is not the team of us for it’s the team of them...”

It would appear that the first group of “them” are the four players from Northern Ireland – no ifs or buts, Northern Ireland is “them”.

How dispiriting that is. Mr MacKenna lives up to that cynical epigram that “...the Irish are very fair people – they never speak well of one another”.

I have, somewhat late in life, come to enjoy the game of rugby and, despite all of our faults and problems, I love to see the Irish team do so well – arguably the only international team sport that Ireland participates in at the top level. Let’s enjoy that – and try to speak better of one another.

Patrick Murray

Address with editor

 

Stacey is spot on over cringeworthy RTÉ

I have just been creased up laughing at Pat Stacey’s piece on independent.ie yesterday – so absolutely spot on about RTÉ’s cringeworthy and seemingly endless fodder and obsession with anything to do with human kennels.

Have always enjoyed his writing but hadn’t read him in a while. Brilliant!

Brenda Devlin

Address with editor

 

Price of home-grown tomatoes is double Dutch

In light of all the talk of saving the planet these days, I would assume it would be better for us to buy locally grown fruit and vegetables so, in light of this, can someone please explain to me why cherry tomatoes from the Netherlands are half the price of Irish-grown tomatoes?

D Byrne

Dublin 8

Irish Independent

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