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Letters to the Editor: 'Boom and bust is down to the parties’ self-interest'

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'With the General Election, we will be treated to the same promises from Fianna Fáil, who lost our sovereignty and destroyed the economy' (stock photo)

'With the General Election, we will be treated to the same promises from Fianna Fáil, who lost our sovereignty and destroyed the economy' (stock photo)

'With the General Election, we will be treated to the same promises from Fianna Fáil, who lost our sovereignty and destroyed the economy' (stock photo)

Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael have, by and large, taken turns in government since the foundation of the State.

Note, I did not say “run the economy” because, during those administrations, each of them has clearly shown they do not have the ability to run the economy.

Both have allowed boom-and-bust policies to continue right up to the present day, purely for their self-interest in maintaining power.

With the General Election, we will be treated to the same promises from Fianna Fáil, who lost our sovereignty and destroyed the economy.

Fine Gael will also promise quick fixes for the A&E trolley crisis, outrageous insurance premiums, soaring rents and a housing shortage.

Just as we heard from both parties prior to the last election.

If only we had the same political accountability and, more importantly, the moral code that we see in the United Kingdom, where people must either resign or are sacked when there are major failings.

Anthony McGeough

Kingswood Heights, Dublin

 

We can expect a sleepy start to General Election day

Since the General Election is on a Saturday, will Leo’s early risers be having a lie-in?

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John Williams

Clonmel, Co Tipperary

 

They are only rearranging the deckchairs on SS Ireland

It looks like the two main parties are dead set on not only rearranging the deckchairs

on SS Ireland, but also switching the ministerial occupants, and attendants, currently sitting in them, with as much ineffectiveness as they have managed in their roles to date.

Liam Power

Dundalk, Co Louth

 

Reduced planning control will bring more monstrosities

Why do commentators continue to call this current Dáil paralysed (Ian O’Doherty, January 14)?

The bad governance of the last 20 years clearly means that we need checks and balances to limit the scope for excess by the powerful.

This applies to both the public and private sectors, as it does to those elected and appointed.

One failure of the last Dáil is the way in which the planning system has been reduced to a limited form of building control. This completely disregards good planning in much the same way as Fianna Fáil did when building Ballymun in response to a 1960s housing crisis.

The result is that we will have lots of “Murphy monstrosities” to remind us of the incompetence of our over-centralised government. Spare us that kind of “paralysis”.

Donal O’Brolchain

Drumcondra, Dublin

 

Ban is an insult to all married Catholic people

The controversy of ordaining married men in the Amazon region of South America is further proof of the deep divisions within the Catholic Church at this time of Pope Francis’s pontificate (Irish Independent, January 14).

Married priests have been a feature of the Eastern Orthodox Church from the beginning of Christianity and also of 23 Catholic Churches of the Eastern Rite.

Indeed, the first Pope, Peter, was married as it is recorded in the Gospels of Mark, Matthew and Luke that Jesus cured his mother-in-law of a serious illness.

Ironically, 11 years ago, Pope Benedict XVI authorised Anglican married priests to maintain their rites and rituals if they joined the Roman Catholic Church.

This controversy in the present Catholic Church on whether married men should be allowed to be ordained is not only a further source of division but is an insult to all Catholic married people, whether men or women, who are deemed unfit to be priests because of a Vatican theology which values and idolises virginity and celibacy as ‘higher’ states of life over marriage.

Brendan Butler

Malahide, Dublin

 

In the beginning was the word: drop the chastity vow

Surely the time has come for the Roman Catholic Church to drop the chastity – not to mind celibacy – vow for the religious life.

According to my copy of the Douay Bible, Old Testament Book 1, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 28 reports the first time God spoke to man, having created him – V.27 – male and female.

Those first words were “increase and multiply”. No ifs or buts, increase and multiply.

Cal Hyland

Rosscarbery, west Cork

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