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In uncertain times, we should reflect on what's important

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'Perhaps during this time of disorder and great uncertainty we can all take time to reflect on how we are as a collective and how we are in a relationship with each other and our planet, our home.' Photo: Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

'Perhaps during this time of disorder and great uncertainty we can all take time to reflect on how we are as a collective and how we are in a relationship with each other and our planet, our home.' Photo: Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

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'Perhaps during this time of disorder and great uncertainty we can all take time to reflect on how we are as a collective and how we are in a relationship with each other and our planet, our home.' Photo: Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

Order. Disorder. Reorder. That’s the normal pattern for all human growth according to Fr Richard Rohr OFM. It’s the growing pain of how we mature. It’s the life-giving cycle of spiritual development.

Perhaps during this time of disorder and great uncertainty we can all take time to reflect on how we are as a collective and how we are in a relationship with each other and our planet, our home.

Perhaps your paper could be more creative in being a conduit to and for your readers to share what this reorder might look like and how we can bring it about together. And let’s do it with great kindness.

Kevin McEvoy

Drumcondra, Dublin

 

Never before have core values of nursing been so crucial

In nursing and midwifery we practice ‘reflection in action’ and ‘reflection on action’ to ensure learning and making sense of an experience.

It’s hard to make sense of the current healthcare crisis and challenges ahead, with updates and guidance on Covid-19 evolving daily. But maybe we need to coin the new phrase of ‘future reflection’. We need to look forward to a time when we will return to normal practice, routine operation lists, outpatient appointments and unrestricted community visits.

We need to look forward to when we can spontaneously reach out with empathetic touch, in times of suffering, loss and recovery.

We must remember this too will pass. We must be brave, courageous and kind to each other.

Never are the core values of nursing and midwifery more important than now; to be caring, compassionate and committed.

To all our nurses and midwives please be mindful of self care, and continue to cultivate hope and resilience in this war against

Covid-19.

Dr Louise Kavanagh McBride PhD

Head of Department of Nursing

 

Crisis will last for months and we must all heed advice

As we work our way through these hours, days, weeks, it will slowly hit us that being at home is no holiday.

We need to be really careful.

This new situation is likely to go on for months. Please look after yourself and those close to you. Right now, we need to focus on our personal responsibility.

Do the right thing today, listen to the advice of our chief medical officer.

Damien Carroll

Dublin 24

 

British response to virus is worse than its Brexit disaster

The British government’s 180-degree turn on ‘herd immunity’ will likely lead to avoidable death and chaos on our nearest neighbours.

Many thought Brexit was Britain’s greatest failure since Suez. Johnson, Cummings et al have gone one better by yet again attempting appeasement with a mortal and relentless enemy. And yet again, indecision and miscalculation will hit hard.

Dr Tony O’Donnell

The Curragh, Co Kildare

 

Eerie silence stirs echoes of Molly’s ghostly presence...

I went out for a quiet walk in Dublin on Patrick’s eve to clear my head. The deserted streets and the eerie silence was surreal.

As I walked, probably Dublin’s most famous daughter Molly Malone came to mind. You could almost imagine and sense her ghostly figure wheeling her barrow along those dark, shadowy, silent streets.

It is prophetic that she also died of a fever and although centuries separate us and despite great advances in medicine and communication, a practically invisible virus can still greatly influence our destiny and remind us to mind our precious planet.

Dr Aidan Hampson

Artane, Dublin

 

Geldof’s determination and spirit should be admired

I hold no brief for Bob Geldof but I am absolutely stunned by the begrudgery expressed in Robert Sullivan’s letter (Irish Independent, March 11).

 In 1985, by sheer force of will, Geldof and Midge Ure organised ‘Live Aid’, a global rock and roll concert which raised $127m (€116m) to alleviate hunger in famine-stricken Africa.

If the man never did another good deed in his life, he earned his wings that day.

But wait.

He did it all again, in the Ebola crisis, 30 years later.

And he is ours. He is an Irishman, born and bred.

We need him here. We need an irascible, abrasive juggernaut to get us through these parlous times and guide us back to safety.

Patricia Moynihan

Castaheany, Co Dublin

Irish Independent