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I am not as proud to be Irish as I once was

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Taoiseach Enda Kenny with members of Young Fine Gael

Taoiseach Enda Kenny with members of Young Fine Gael

Taoiseach Enda Kenny with members of Young Fine Gael

For many, the next few years in Ireland will be bleak. The global recession has created negativity and anger throughout Ireland. I have now become resigned to the disappointment and anger felt by so many people.

I completed five years of university in October 2010. I have an undergraduate degree in Business Management and a postgraduate degree in International Business. I am in the fortunate position of not owning a property in Ireland and as such had no real ties to stay in Ireland except for my family and friends who had not already left!

Recently, my confidence in the government and their economic policies has hit an all-time low. When I left university, I was greeted with a rude awakening.

The graduate roles evaporated promptly. There was intense competition from people who were made redundant along with thousands of other graduates. I had to resort to emigrating to London, where I secured permanent employment.

I always put my best foot forward while remaining upbeat, but while watching international news coverage on Ireland for the first time I am not as proud to be Irish as I once was. I wanted to stay and begin working my way up the "corporate ladder"; however, with almost 30pc of people under 25 unemployed, the situation was austere.

I had to make the decision to leave Ireland, and in many ways I feel guilty. The Irish taxpayer had paid for my education but I am not paying into the Irish tax system.

Many Irish people are leaving their families behind in the quest for suitable employment. Now that I have begun my job here in London, it's onwards and upwards, it's just a shame that I am not in Ireland.

Des O'Connor
London

Irish Independent