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Greens must get real and learn about compromise

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'If the Greens do make a deal, then Catherine Martin above all has to give it her full endorsement, otherwise the membership will vote it down.' Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins

'If the Greens do make a deal, then Catherine Martin above all has to give it her full endorsement, otherwise the membership will vote it down.' Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins

'If the Greens do make a deal, then Catherine Martin above all has to give it her full endorsement, otherwise the membership will vote it down.' Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins

As someone who has had an interest in politics all their life, I just can’t figure the Greens out.

It’s very simple, if you want to make meaningful changes to your society you have to play an active role in the government.

Unfortunately the Greens are acting like one-topic activists. A lot of their newer members don’t see the bigger picture, or as Seamus Brennan once said, “it’s senior hurling now, lads”.

We all know we have to make changes to help the environment for our children and grandchildren and the Greens can lead this, but they need to learn about compromise. 

If the talks fail and we have another election then I can tell the 12 Green TDs some of you will not make it back to the Dáil.

Yes, they will get their hands burnt in government, as Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael will too, but there is just no alternative and the sooner this pain starts the better.

If the Greens do make a deal, then Catherine Martin above all has to give it her full endorsement, otherwise the membership will vote it down.

It’s time to stand up and be counted.

Donough O’Reilly

Kilmacud, Co Dublin

 

Planet has been around long time...but the Greens will not

Muscle-flexing by Catherine Martin and subservient leader Eamon Ryan has set the Green Party up for a spectacular fall.

While the country is leaderless and steeped in debt, these two planet-savers, who appear to be unaware of the current dire straits our economy is facing into, are almost totally preoccupied with a 7pc reduction in carbon emissions and other Green issues.

Though the likelihood of austerity has been poopooed by some in the caretaker Government, it is hard to see how it can be avoided in the medium to long term, as economists grapple with the uncertain duration of the economic paralysis brought about by the coronavirus pandemic. If ever there was a time for ‘all shoulders to the wheel’, this is it.

With a broken economy and little prospect of trading our way out of trouble for the foreseeable future, Green Party strategists would do well to remember the advice from James Carville in 1992: “It’s the economy, stupid.”

My advice, for what it’s worth, would be – the planet has been around for a very long time, you certainly won’t.

Niall Ginty

Killester, Dublin

 

Range of options for dealing with contentious artefacts

As a medical student in Dublin in 1966, I was woken by the explosion that destroyed Nelson’s Pillar and brought Horatio Nelson’s statue crashing to the ground amid hundreds of tonnes of rubble.

A life-size statue of Queen Victoria was removed from Leinster House in 1948 and put into storage until it was sent on loan to Sydney in 1984 with the expectation that it would never return.

There is a wide variety of options for the appropriate disposal of contentious artefacts.

Dr John Doherty 

Gaoth Dobhair, Co Dhún na nGall

 

Some statues would be better off staying where they are

Please tell me Ballinspittle won’t be moving.

Brian Ahern

Dublin 15

 

An important question on society going back to normal

When the pubs reopen will the closing times be staggered?                                  

Declan Heaney

Claremorris, Co Mayo

 

Romans could’ve learned a thing or two from Irish pair

Dr Michael Foley (Letters, June 9) appears to give too much credit to the Romans for their water transport technology: the Romans never came to Ireland, and maybe there’s a message in that. They never stayed too long in Egypt or North Africa, and maybe there’s a message in that too.

The Irish never had any problem managing floods, droughts, hurricanes, or blizzards, so this drought is not likely to beat them now.

Proof of this can be found deep in the Arabian desert: some 40 years ago two young brothers from Antrim took their farming systems to Saudi Arabia and greened the desert. Alastair and Paddy McGuckian did so by boring wells into fossil water reservoirs deep under the desert sands.

They then set up the biggest dairy farm in the world with 70,000 cows. Based on that, the Irish Masstock/Almarai Group processed the milk into a new range of dairy products which they distributed across Arabia and the Middle East.

The McGuckians were pioneering Irishmen. The Romans could still learn a thing or two from them about how to move and how to use water.

Brendan Dunleavy

Killeshandra, Co Cavan

Irish Independent