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Greens in North who try to influence Republic are naive

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"We are an island of two nations with differing systems of national government pertaining exclusively to each government, separately." Stock image.

"We are an island of two nations with differing systems of national government pertaining exclusively to each government, separately." Stock image.

"We are an island of two nations with differing systems of national government pertaining exclusively to each government, separately." Stock image.

Clare Bailey, Green Party MLA in Northern Ireland, has pleaded for her domestic party voters to go against the Republic’s proposed programme for government.

Talk about a clumsy nuts of a contention when southern Irish citizens living abroad do not even have a postal vote in Dáil elections, yet Ms Bailey sees herself as part of a British administration but in a prime position to put a stop to our gallop down here?

We are an island of two nations with differing systems of national government pertaining exclusively to each government, separately. The northern Greens wishing to have a say in how their comrades who vote south of the Border for the Republic’s government are delusional in their naivety.

Even Sinn Féin knows this when we here in the glorious 26 voted to jettison any claim over the North by rejecting Articles 2 and 3 of our Constitution. This means that it and the very friendly Greens are in the same boat.

Whatever about being equal, depending on perspective, we are definitely separate in both parts of the political divide, starting and ending with our ballot box contributions.

Robert Sullivan

Bantry, Co Cork

Environmentalists over the Border do have a say here

Many people are asking why it is either good or democratic that the fate of government formation in the Republic should in part depend on the votes of northern Green Party members who are not bound by our laws or pay taxes to our Exchequer.

But there are many good reasons for this.

Article 2 of our Constitution states: “It is the entitlement and birthright of every person born in the island of Ireland, which includes its islands and seas, to be part of the Irish nation.”

We have also exercised considerable influence on the affairs of Northern Ireland through the institutions established under the Good Friday Agreement.

So why should Green Party members, resident in Northern Ireland and entitled to Irish citizenship, not also have a say in our affairs?

Furthermore, Sinn Féin is also organised on an all-Ireland basis and its members, resident in Northern Ireland, have long had a say on Sinn Féin policies for the island of Ireland as a whole. Or are these people really saying they only want northern nationalists to have a say in our affairs?

Residents of Northern Ireland also take part in our national Gaelic football, rugby, hockey and cricket competitions and teams, and often work and pay taxes here.

The fact that only 195 out of 800 northern based Green Party members have registered to vote on the deal shows a certain reticence about involving themselves in our affairs.

They should be encouraged rather than discouraged to do so. Climate change, no less than the Covid-19 virus, does not recognise political boundaries.

Frank Schnittger

Blessington, Co Wicklow

 

If Government deal fails, Greens will pay in election

IF A new government is not formed after the votes are counted next Friday and we have an election, then the Green candidates are going to need more than face masks and PPE going door to door.

Why have the three TDs unhappy with the deal come out to say they are now voting no, but when the parliamentary party voted they abstained? Can I also ask, why abstain? It’s simple – it’s yes or no.

Did they not realise that an abstention was just a wishy washy no?

Is it right that Claire Bailey should have a vote on a deal that will not effect her directly?

Power to change is in government not on the opposition benches, we already have enough hurlers on the ditch in opposition.

I would imagine Eamon Ryan would be

glad to hand over the leadership mantle of the party to Catherine Martin if this deal falls through.

I will give her credit that despite her opposition to go into talks with Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael that she has now stood behind the deal despite some misgivings and has shown some leadership.

Donough O’Reilly

Kilmacud, Co Dublin

 

Agreement means nation will be governed by FF and FG

THE programme for government agreed by the party leaders and the party TDs is with the party members for approval.

This is an agreement lacking detail and open to interpretation but not open to review (‘Varadkar shoots down Greens’ call for review’, Irish Independent, June 20).

It seems the Greens and the Irish people have been sold “a pig in a poke” which if ratified will result in a Fianna Fáil/Fine Gael government programme implemented regardless of the Green agenda.

How can Varadkar be trusted in these circumstances?

Hugh McDermott

Dromahair, Co Leitrim

Irish Independent