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Covid test results should not be given to employers first

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The real issue of course is the speed of the testing, so perhaps the HSE and its chief Paul Reid should put their focus here rather than relying on data breaches to disseminate information in a timely fashion. Photo: Stock Image

The real issue of course is the speed of the testing, so perhaps the HSE and its chief Paul Reid should put their focus here rather than relying on data breaches to disseminate information in a timely fashion. Photo: Stock Image

The real issue of course is the speed of the testing, so perhaps the HSE and its chief Paul Reid should put their focus here rather than relying on data breaches to disseminate information in a timely fashion. Photo: Stock Image

RTÉ has reported that in instances of mass screenings where a whole workforce is tested, the HSE issued results to employers. I would be absolutely furious if that happened to me.

Yes, the employers need to be informed but it needs to be a case of the employee informing the employer and not the other way around. There may also be other sensitive medical data that could be communicated to persons other than the individual.

The real issue of course is the speed of the testing, so perhaps the HSE and its chief Paul Reid should put their focus here rather than relying on data breaches to disseminate information in a timely fashion.

No doubt the inquiries that will surely follow this pandemic will reveal that this is not the only poor judgment exercised by the HSE and CMO.

Killian Brennan

Malahide Road, Dublin 17

 

Questioning crisis experts an act of cynicism by TDs

THE 19-member Dáil committee on Covid-19 (‘Pandemic forecast warned 39,000 could have died in Ireland by today’, Irish Independent, May 19), questioning those who by their advice are saving the country from the virus, is a cynical exercise to make TDs relevant during this time at the expense of those most relevant. 

Hugh McDermott

Dromahair, Co Leitrim

 

National emergency a platform for opportunism

ONE of the most frustrating aspects of our response to the Covid-19 outbreak has been to see the cynical opportunism of various interest groups, politicians and ideologues, in using the crisis to advance their own agendas.

First we had Dublin City Council’s plan to stop traffic through College Green and take more road space for cyclists and pedestrians – ostensibly a plan in response to Covid-19 but which is remarkably similar to a pre-existing plan which was blocked by An Bord Pleanála in 2018.

Then we had the Construction Industry Federation laying groundwork for outlandish increases in construction prices whilst answering questions in front of the new Dáil committee on Covid-19.

Their figures included a potential 40pc increase in the cost of the long-overdue and already over-budget National Children’s Hospital.

The most ludicrous example of brazen opportunism, however, belongs to the Green Party.

Its councillor Donna Cooney attempted to connect a gorse fire on Bull Island to the return of traffic to that area.

Of course we expect ideologically driven elected officials to attempt to advance the causes in which they believe or which they represent.

However, to do so under the cover of a national emergency which has left millions of people fearing for their future is nothing short of reprehensible.

Simon O’Connor

Crumlin, Dublin 12

 

Irish clubs stand tall with cream of Premier League

Gerard O’Regan (Irish Independent, May 16) mentions teams like Manchester United and Liverpool as examples of those “branded into our consciousness”.

Let us not forget, however, that our own teams here at home (Dundalk, Shamrock Rovers, etc) enjoy, and indeed deserve, the same status.

Tom Gilsenan

Beaumont, Dublin 9

Leinster Rugby needs to add Seoul when game returns

ON ITS return to competitive action, FC Seoul filled the empty spaces in their large stadium with life-size sex dolls, in front of life-size cardboard cut-outs of the team’s players.

But far from being distracted by the dolls, FC Seoul defeated Gwangju FC 1-0 in the fixture.

Can I suggest that Leinster Rugby employ a similar strategy if their long-delayed Heineken Cup quarter-final against Saracens in the Aviva Stadium is ever played?

TV commentators will have to exercise some restraint in their commentary with no references to coaches rolling in the aisles or getting too excited.

Frank Schnittger

Blessington, Co Wicklow

 

Bleach may be the answer to Trump’s hair-raising style

It appears Donald Trump’s latest antidote for Covid-19 is a hydroxychloroquine pill washed down with a gallon of bleach! It won’t cure the virus but it will do strange things to your hair.

Seamus McLoughlin

Keshcarrigan, Co Leitrim

Irish Independent