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Council can begin to redress this misogynistic omission

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Ms Sabina Higgins and then social protection minister Leo Varadkar with a picture of Nurse O'Farrell at the opening of public office Elizabeth O'Farrell House in Dublin in 2016. Photo: RollingNews.ie

Ms Sabina Higgins and then social protection minister Leo Varadkar with a picture of Nurse O'Farrell at the opening of public office Elizabeth O'Farrell House in Dublin in 2016. Photo: RollingNews.ie

Ms Sabina Higgins and then social protection minister Leo Varadkar with a picture of Nurse O'Farrell at the opening of public office Elizabeth O'Farrell House in Dublin in 2016. Photo: RollingNews.ie

I concur with the sentiments of Michael Clemenger’s letter on the air-brushing of Elizabeth O’Farrell from Irish history (‘Paying respect to woman forgotten by Irish history’, Letters, June 25).

In 2013, Dublin City Council invited nominations from the public for the naming of the new Liffey Luas bridge at Hawkins Street. Elizabeth O’Farrell was nominated for consideration. Ten nominations were referred to the council’s naming committee which chose to name the bridge after Rosie Hackett, a trade unionist and republican revolutionary, a very worthy choice.

The selection of Rosie Hackett in no way diminishes the standing of Elizabeth O’Farrell, an ordinary Dubliner who was a local and national hero. This heroic lady, with scant regard for her own safety, not only tended to the wounded rebels in the GPO during the Easter Rising, but delivered the letter of surrender from Patrick Pearse to Brigadier General Lowe and carried the surrender dispatches to the rebel commandants throughout the city.
Curiously, Elizabeth O’Farrell was airbrushed from the official photograph of Pearse’s surrender. The roles that generations of Irish women have played in the political, cultural, religious and civic life in Ireland have been immeasurable but are not sufficiently acknowledged.

Dublin City Council can begin to redress this misogynistic omission by recognising the sacrifices and heroism of Mná na hÉireann. It is pathetic that in this state we retain buildings, quays and streets memorialising Queen Victoria who reigned in Ireland during the starvation of millions while ignoring women who fed the hungry.

Tom Cooper

Templeogue, Dublin

Fly the flag for empty grand gestures and daft protests

Members of Dublin City Council voted to install a rake of flagpoles near the Russian Embassy in Dublin and then festoon the whole area with Ukrainian flags.

That’ll put the pesky Russians under pressure, appears to be the thinking.

Is there no getting away from attempts to gild fading Irish lilies with daft protests and empty grand gestures on an epic scale?

What next: an actual moving holy statue trundled up and down that road to further provide proof of faith in the national identity?

Robert Sullivan,

Bantry, Co Cork

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Break out the barbie this summer? What summer?

As the rain continues to fall in stair rods, and the winds rearrange landscapes and garden furniture, while dispersing golfers on the course below, I feel smugly content that the barbecue I bought today is dry and safe in the boot of my car.

Tom McGrath

Wicklow Town, Co Wicklow

Proposed plans to improve bus service light on specifics

Many will now be aware that the Dublin-based National Transport Authority (NTA) recently issued an updated document containing some broad schematics of the proposed Bus Connects project for Cork city.

The document contains little detail of the changes to the proposed routes but concentrates – in glowing terms – on the positive outcomes for the citizens. Significantly, it doesn’t afford any detail of the serious negatives and impositions for those unfortunates living along the routes.

For instance, it refers to the removal of some garden space, which is a euphemism for the confiscation of large tracts from people’s front gardens as well as frontage from businesses. This will be achieved in many cases by the crude method of compulsory purchase orders.

The associated loss of vital off-road parking spaces will require homeowners to seek alternative facilities and probably pay for the privilege. Crucially, removal of garden space will result in heavy traffic racing within metres of homeowners’ front doors, with increased air and noise pollution, as well as the diminution of privacy and an increased probability of subsidence in some cases.

At a time when biodiversity and habitat loss are high on the Government’s agenda, the road-widening proposals will result in the widespread destruction of natural assets across 110 kilometres of streets and roads. Garden spaces, trees, hedges and flower beds will be replaced with concrete.

The Public Spending Code requires that alternative solutions be investigated and the outcomes published. There is no reference to any alternatives in the NTA document. Neither is there any reference to the required environmental impact assessment reports or safety reports for the proposal.

Home and business owners should be under no illusion as to the inconvenience and long-term difficulties of these proposals and would be well advised to prepare for the onslaught to come.

John Leahy

Wilton Road, Co Cork


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