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Brassed off at the 'golden generation'

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Tommy Bowe races through the USA defence
during Ireland's win at the Stadium Taranaki in
New Zealand on Sunday

Tommy Bowe races through the USA defence during Ireland's win at the Stadium Taranaki in New Zealand on Sunday

Tommy Bowe races through the USA defence during Ireland's win at the Stadium Taranaki in New Zealand on Sunday

•Someone really ought to advise the ever more bewildering Declan Kidney that sport is supposed to be about imposing order on chaos, not supplementing the chaos with large dollops of confusion and dysfunction.

I was one of those simple souls who went along to Lansdowne Road in the 60s and 70s.

When sponsorship never got beyond who paid for the segment of orange that was presented to each player at half-time, and when the game was played with a laced ball.

Back then, there was no 'red army' to be called upon when Munster turned up.

You might see the odd refugee from the Leeside looking fruitlessly for a pint of Beamish as he roared on Barry McGann, but an army? No.

Therefore, forgive me if I am a little bemused by the reverence for the modern game, and the foolish talk about a "golden generation".

To merit that title, one would have to have got a little closer to the William Webb Ellis trophy then we have managed to date.

Mr Kidney, perhaps prophetically, primed his already well-preened, sun-tanned professionals, by sending them bungee jumping and go-karting in preparation for meeting the US Eagles.

It was in hindsight sadly apt that our boys were prepared for free-falling, while the Eagles soared and flew to new heights.

There has been a maddening mantra within Irish camps where no matter how ignominious the string of defeats, you are told: "You don't become a bad team overnight."

Well I could not agree more. It has taken Mr Kidney a good deal longer than that to bring these boys to such a sorry pass.

A team that consistently takes the wrong options, misses opportunities and cannot summon the fire of a glow worm, will not rise above the mediocre.

Dr Johnson once wryly suggested that the Irish were a fair-minded people as they never spoke well of one another.

How lovely it would be to be given the chance to prove him wrong.

Yet I fear that the term 'golden generation' belongs to the men Ireland will face this Saturday.

However, you brought my heart in your kit-bags along with the hopes of a nation.

So give it a lash, Brian, Paul et al.

GR Baxter
Sandymount, Dublin 4

Irish Independent