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A sticking-plaster solution after failing to plan for Brexit

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak. Photo: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak. Photo: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak. Photo: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

The TV series The A-Team had a catch-phrase, “I love it when a plan comes together.” Well, the reverse is what is unfolding to the east of us.

Britain failed to understand how much they relied on johnny foreigner to do the heavy lifting, eg, fruit and vegetable picking and packing, freight driving, and hotel and catering work. All of these areas are now chronically understaffed, leading to all kinds of food and fuel shortages and hotels and restaurants running at 50pc to 70pc capacity.

Boris is now biting the bullet and offering a sticking-plaster, short-term solution when it is far too late, although it can also be argued that some of the blame lies with the big supermarkets and their constant attacks on supplier prices. The pity is that possibly the worst British PM ever, surrounded by an equally appalling front bench, has no ideas, no plans apart from nonsense like “global Britain” and “world trade deals”. Even Baldrick had a plan!!

We are suffering too, and will continue to do so as innocent by-standers.

When – not if – Scotland goes its own way it will be even more difficult for us, assuming they remain in the EU.

All this hassle just because Boris and his foolish followers think they’re a world power, when in reality they are rapidly becoming a laughing stock.

David Ryan

Co Meath

 

Fairer system for working out allocation of college places

The present system whereby some students who achieve maximum possible points or sufficient points and still fail to obtain a place in their chosen course is clearly unfair. But there is an easy and fairer solution. Current points scores are crudely based on grades: the same grade may be awarded to students obtaining widely differing marks.

In the case of a points tie, I propose that the total percentage marks in their subjects be used to determine who is awarded a place in a given course. This I believe would provide a much fairer system than the present random selection which is effectively just a lottery.

Emeritus Professor Des MacHale

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Blackrock, Cork

 

Women have it within their power to change dynamic

Amy Molloy tells us that ‘the average value of assets owned by male politicians (€1.2m) is almost double that of their female counterparts (€675,000)’ (‘Disparity between the genders in Dáil is striking,’ Irish Independent, September 25).

A more significant fact in relation to women politicians is that more than 100 years after women received the vote the Dáil is nearly 80pc male. If women, who because they live longer are a majority in the electorate, voted for women not alone would there be more women in the Dáil but they would also have more power to represent their fellow female citizens and enable them to advance their interests in society.

A Leavy

Dublin 13

 

Female voters look beyond gender on election day

It was interesting to read about gender balance in politics in Amy Molloy’s article (‘Disparity between the genders in Dáil is striking,’ Irish Independent, September 25). I feel I must point out what seems to be conveniently forgotten by female journalists: despite the fact that half of the population is female we don’t just vote for female candidates because they are female.

The last election is proof of this, given the amount of female candidates who lost their seats: eight high-profile candidates, by my reckoning. It’s not just about numbers, the candidates have to be more than just female.

D Byrne

Dublin 8

 

Would Government freeze this source of tax revenue?

I think Larissa Nolan is missing the point (‘Warped logic over landlords shows how out of touch Leo is,’ Irish Independent, September 25). Landlords pay 60pc tax on earnings. Is it any wonder the Government would not want to freeze that cash cow?

Adam Furlong

Dublin8

 

A waffler? Looking back, that really is a bit rich, Bertie

We all remember when Bertie Ahern, in one of those ‘let him without sin cast the first stone moments’, on the floor of the Dáil, accused opposition TD Gay Mitchell of being “a waffler”.

Now that we know for sure that there are at least 68 TDs who are millionaires, with the other 98 being merely rich, we know that what he really meant was that they are all properly rich wafflers.

Liam Power

Blackrock, Dundalk, Co Louth


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