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Why it is appropriate to invite May to Dáil

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British Prime Minister Theresa May. Photo: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

British Prime Minister Theresa May. Photo: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

PA

British Prime Minister Theresa May. Photo: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

The buffoonery of British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, in comparing the French President François Hollande to a World War II prison guard, doesn't auger well for the tone of the Brexit negotiations.

The more the British decide to play up to their tabloid stereotypes about their continental neighbours, the more they are upping the ante.

Johnson was crassly responding to comments that Hollande would not be prepared to give Britain a better deal outside the Single Market than in it.

Number 10 Downing Street even had to insist Johnson wasn't comparing the French president to a Nazi.

The foreign minister's appreciation of European history would appear to need a refresher course.

The British appear determined not just to leave the EU, but to burn all their bridges behind them.

Neither side can afford to be seen as the loser in the negotiations, so a calm and collected debate would be preferable to reduce the heat.

Playing to the gallery, British Prime Minister Theresa May threatened to walk away from the negotiations if she was offered a bad deal by Brussels.

And here, we are caught between the proverbial rock and hard place. In this regard, it is appropriate that May be invited to address the Dáil during her visit later this month.

The prime minister is visiting Ireland to begin formal Brexit talks with Taoiseach Enda Kenny.

The visit affords an opportunity to hear first-hand the British position and to give our views on this vitally important development for our country.

And unlike Johnson's diplomatic inadequacies, we won't make any comparisons to Queen Elizabeth I.

Irish Independent