| 7.2°C Dublin

Future politicians could learn from current crop

Close

'On the domestic front, Enda Kenny must now decide how he tells not only his own party but also the country when he intends to step down as Taoiseach and leader of Fine Gael.' Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

'On the domestic front, Enda Kenny must now decide how he tells not only his own party but also the country when he intends to step down as Taoiseach and leader of Fine Gael.' Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

'On the domestic front, Enda Kenny must now decide how he tells not only his own party but also the country when he intends to step down as Taoiseach and leader of Fine Gael.' Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Across the Irish Sea, our friends and neighbours are in the middle of an identity crisis. Struggling with the fallout from Brexit, British Prime Minister Theresa May has suffered yet another House of Lords defeat.

She knows she has to trigger Article 50 within days, but she doesn't know what impact the manoeuvre will cause across Europe.

Move just 200 miles east and the political instability is even more to the fore.

Our French counterparts are about to vote in an election that could have a seismic impact, not just on France, but on the European Union as a whole.

If the French people elect the National Front's Marine Le Pen as their new president, one can rest assured that the European Union will enter its darkest days.

On the domestic front, Enda Kenny must now decide how he tells not only his own party but also the country when he intends to step down as Taoiseach and leader of Fine Gael.

In political circles today, people have begun to discuss openly the extraordinary legacy that will be left behind by Sinn Féin deputy leader and the North's deputy first minister Martin McGuinness.

Enda Kenny was the first major political leader to wish Mr McGuinness well in his period of poor health.

We are about to lose a generation of politicians, but another one will follow.

The class of the future could probably draw lessons from the Kenny/McGuinness era.

Two politicians who didn't necessarily see eye to eye, but who got on for the sake of people on both sides of the island of Ireland.

Irish Independent