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Envoy's articulate reply in defence of Ireland

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Mr Mulhall is an interesting character, as he combines his diplomatic role with his scholarship on Irish literature, in particular as an authority on WB Yeats.  Picture: Gerry Mooney.

Mr Mulhall is an interesting character, as he combines his diplomatic role with his scholarship on Irish literature, in particular as an authority on WB Yeats. Picture: Gerry Mooney.

Mr Mulhall is an interesting character, as he combines his diplomatic role with his scholarship on Irish literature, in particular as an authority on WB Yeats. Picture: Gerry Mooney.

In these troubled times in Washington, it's good to know we'll have someone representing us in DC who won't shirk from defending our cause.

One of our most distinguished diplomats, Dan Mulhall, is leaving his station in London to become Ambassador to the United States of America.

Mr Mulhall is an interesting character, as he combines his diplomatic role with his scholarship on Irish literature, in particular as an authority on WB Yeats.

During the Ireland 2016 commemorations, the London bureau was among the most active of our embassies in ensuring the centenary of the 1916 Rising was marked on the international stage. The events were handled sensitively and appropriately by the Irish Embassy on Grosvenor Place.

On his way out the door, Mr Mulhall didn't shirk from standing up for our nation when he saw it slighted.

'The Times' of London saw fit to publish a column questioning whether Ireland is a country at all.

One of its columnists says "Ireland itself has a tenuous claim to nationhood, having seceded from Britain as the Irish Free State in 1922".

The previous 800 years would appear to not be on the curriculum in British schools.

Mr Mulhall articulately interjected pointing out: "Irish nationhood is based on a strong sense of identity, distinctive culture and shared values and interests. Nothing 'tenuous'."

A worthy riposte not requiring further explanation.

Irish Independent