Tuesday 20 August 2019

Apple's presence in Ireland is fruitful again

Apple’s decision to add 1,000 people to its Hollyhill base over the next two years is a welcome one for Cork and for Ireland
Apple’s decision to add 1,000 people to its Hollyhill base over the next two years is a welcome one for Cork and for Ireland
Editorial

Editorial

There is one strong international message being sent out by Apple's huge expansion plans for Cork: industrial and technological life exists outside Dublin.

This is critical for a number of reasons. At present, Dublin gets the lion's share of tech investment into Ireland. Indeed, one metric - venture capital funding - shows Dublin hoovering up roughly twice as much investment as the rest of the country put together.

This is why Apple's decision to add 1,000 people to its Hollyhill base over the next two years is a welcome one for Cork and for Ireland.

Of equal importance is the credibility of the company announcing the jobs. Not only is Apple the biggest technology company in the world with stable revenues, it has a solid track record in following through on its stated plans. In a pre-election era of flaky job announcements "over the next three years", this matters. If Apple says it will create 1,000 jobs, it probably means it.

Sceptics might ask whether there is anything more to Apple's relationship with the Irish Government than an industrial partnership.

On this account, there are certainly legitimate questions around taxation between Ireland and Apple that will soon resurface. In a matter of weeks, the European Commission is expected to deliver its verdict on whether Ireland provided illegal state aid to Apple through the application of tax rates. The Government vehemently denies this, but is not as certain as it once was that it will win the case, despite many economic commentators arguing that the European Commission is overstepping its power in seeking to oversee tax policy here.

Tax aside, Apple's presence in Ireland is a long-standing and fruitful one. It has been in Cork for 35 of its 39 years.

"We don't see ourselves as just a company that is in Ireland, we see ourselves rooted here," said CEO Tim Cook. "Apple is proud to call Ireland home."

Irish Independent

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