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Dominic Delusion: rules are meant for other people

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Dominic Cummings (Yui Mok/PA)

Dominic Cummings (Yui Mok/PA)

PA

Dominic Cummings (Yui Mok/PA)

Covid-19 has been very useful in teaching us about that mysterious psychological phenomenon, Sense of Entitlement. This is a condition that informs the sufferer that the rules do not apply to him or her. It is also known as the Dominic Delusion, and more recently as the Mary Lou Me Fein Complex.

An early victim of the disorder was Scotland's chief medical officer, Dr Catherine Calderwood, who resigned having been found not to have understood what lockdown meant. She confused 'home' with 'homes'. Not far behind was Professor Neil Ferguson, a prominent member of SAGE, the body which advises the UK Government on Covid-19. He failed to understand that inviting his friend/lover over for the night was a clear case of putting his needs above those of the community he lives in. And then there is the recently resigned New Zealand health minister, Dr David Clark, who must have been so delighted with the NZ performance during the pandemic that he decided the methods used did not apply to him and his family. Off they went to the beach. One wonders if being very well educated and in a prominent job makes it easier to suffer the Dominic Delusion. And of course there's Billy 'I don't self-isolate' Kelleher.

Mary Lou McDonald has been doubly unfortunate. First of all, she got the virus in April and it "floored" her. One would have thought that would have made her particularly careful and she would know all about social distancing. I don't know if she has been in the company of Mr Cummings, it seems unlikely, but in any case she caught the political strain of the virus too. From the photos I have seen, she clearly failed to understand words like 'crowd', 'face mask' or 'two metres'. Mary Lou is now in the distinguished company of Dominic Cummings and Donald Trump in another unlikely 2020 coalition.