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Women's Day should mean more than brands jumping on the bandwagon

Lorraine Courtney


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Celebration: Sabina Higgins, wife of President Michael D Higgins, visits the Amal Women’s Association at the Islamic Foundation of Ireland on International Women’s Day last year. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Celebration: Sabina Higgins, wife of President Michael D Higgins, visits the Amal Women’s Association at the Islamic Foundation of Ireland on International Women’s Day last year. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Collins Dublin, Gareth Chaney

Celebration: Sabina Higgins, wife of President Michael D Higgins, visits the Amal Women’s Association at the Islamic Foundation of Ireland on International Women’s Day last year. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

As you might be guessing from the many promotional emails or your hairdresser advertising deals, March 8 is International Women's Day. Women, you may have had it rough with pay inequality, sexual harassment, and that whole systemic discrimination thing, but today is your day to get your hair done with a €10 discount.

I'll be ignoring the day this year. There was a time when I would mention International Women's Day (IWD) and people would look confused. In fact, it wasn't even that many years ago.

Nowadays, I'm bombarded with ads for slogan T-shirts and feminist necklaces, and exploitative PR pitches urging me to express solidarity with other women by shopping from late February onwards.