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Women taking control of their own bodies has a long history

Naomi Rendina


Foreign Dispatch

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The US Supreme Court’s decision last week ended women's constitutional right to an abortion in the US. Photo: Stock image

The US Supreme Court’s decision last week ended women's constitutional right to an abortion in the US. Photo: Stock image

Naomi Rendina

Naomi Rendina

/

The US Supreme Court’s decision last week ended women's constitutional right to an abortion in the US. Photo: Stock image

With the US Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women’s Health Organisation, abortion is now illegal in many states. The decision came at a moment when we were witnessing momentum toward criminalising abortion, political leaders hinting at banning contraception and misguided calls for women to breastfeed in response to a formula shortage.

At the heart of this is an argument that medical interventions related to reproduction and birth are unnatural – perhaps even unethical. But women have long sought ways to intervene in their reproductive journeys to control when and how they have children.


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