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We're all suffering with our own lockdown demons - so let's not be too quick to judge

Colette Browne


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Queue: Garda at a checkpoint on the N3 at Clonee ahead of the Easter weekend. Photo: Frank McGrath

Queue: Garda at a checkpoint on the N3 at Clonee ahead of the Easter weekend. Photo: Frank McGrath

Queue: Garda at a checkpoint on the N3 at Clonee ahead of the Easter weekend. Photo: Frank McGrath

As the lockdown drags on, the level of sanctimony in some quarters about people allegedly breaching social distancing guidelines is reaching epic proportions. Last week, those with holiday homes were public enemy number one. These selfish swine were apparently travelling from their palatial pads in Dublin to bijou cottages in some of Ireland's most scenic areas - carrying disease and pestilence with them in their vulgar Range Rovers.

To listen to some reports, the hordes decamping to rural areas were akin to some kind of biblical plague swarming throughout the country. Vigilante signs, threatening to destroy their property, even appeared in one sleepy village.

But where was the evidence that this mass movement of well-heeled ingrates was occurring? Some of those complaining offered pictures of queues of traffic on motorways to support their contention that there was a mass exodus from the city. They failed to mention that lanes had been closed to facilitate Garda checkpoints, creating long tailbacks, or that thousands of essential staff still need to commute to the capital for work.