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Wedding preparation fails the only test I have for treatments that change your appearance, which is that you should be doing it for yourself

Ellen Coyne


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The expectation of ultra-perfect skin, teeth, hair and nails puts huge pressure on brides-to-be

The expectation of ultra-perfect skin, teeth, hair and nails puts huge pressure on brides-to-be

The expectation of ultra-perfect skin, teeth, hair and nails puts huge pressure on brides-to-be

The wedding invites came like a flight of swallows. This summer has brought with it a glut of nuptials — some which had been postponed by the virus, others which were the fruit of much shorter engagements. Many have found their own good reasons over the last few years not to risk waiting for rescheduled flights to famous skylines or watercolour horizons to ask their lover an important question. Plenty of humble kitchen floors have hosted bended knees. And plenty of newly betrothed couples have rightly interrogated the sense in waiting a long time to wed.

So each fine Saturday morning, maybe just like today’s, you’ll find women with wagon-wheel-style rollers in their hair milling around motorway service stations looking for emergency safety pins. The forecourt is full of men gingerly trying to charm the petrol-pump hose and its dripping mouth away from their pristine white shirts. My permanent plus-one and I are in the middle of a marathon run of half a dozen weddings, in almost as many weeks. So, I’ve often been sitting on a hot car seat in a petrol-station car park, unravelling my own pin and curl, wondering if we’ll ever find the remote church in the obscure little parish that would make a fool of any Eircode.


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