| 1.8°C Dublin

Close

Premium


We have to knuckle down now to save Christmas or else face it on our own with a turkey

Senan Molony



Close

We have to take this opportunity to knuckle down "unless we really do want to be on our own with tinsel, turkey and unpulled crackers" writes Senan Molony

We have to take this opportunity to knuckle down "unless we really do want to be on our own with tinsel, turkey and unpulled crackers" writes Senan Molony

First dance: A passer-by at Dublin’s Grand Canal looks on as Rita Nunes poses with her husband Eric Nunes on their wedding day, after having to cancel it previously due to lockdown. PHOTO: REUTERS/CLODAGH KILCOYNE

First dance: A passer-by at Dublin’s Grand Canal looks on as Rita Nunes poses with her husband Eric Nunes on their wedding day, after having to cancel it previously due to lockdown. PHOTO: REUTERS/CLODAGH KILCOYNE

/

We have to take this opportunity to knuckle down "unless we really do want to be on our own with tinsel, turkey and unpulled crackers" writes Senan Molony

One of the first chroniclers of Ireland was Gerald of Wales, who came in 1186. He marvelled at Irish people's capacity to behave as they liked, blaming their failure to listen to preachers - although we were Christian and already over-celebrated Christmas.

It's noteworthy that Gerald arrived almost with the Normans, meaning he spotted what must have been long-ingrained national traits. So it's not the case that casual Irish rule-breaking is a product of 800 years of colonial oppression. It's always been there.


Most Watched





Privacy