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UK is playing such a dangerous game that Ireland must let world know what's at stake

John Downing



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Breaking agreement: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the House of Commons, London, yesterday. Photo: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Handout via REUTERS

Breaking agreement: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the House of Commons, London, yesterday. Photo: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Handout via REUTERS

Breaking agreement: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the House of Commons, London, yesterday. Photo: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/Handout via REUTERS

Ere the ink wherewith 'twas writ could dry. Like my classmates, all of us barely 10 years old, I committed that strange phrase to memory without much understanding of its meaning. Many decades later it stays lodged in the back of the head along with chunks of the Memorare, the words of Tantum Ergo, and strange mathematical formulae as Gaeilge.

Go immediately to the top of the class if you know that phrase refers to the Treaty of Limerick of 1691 and the speed with which the London authorities broke it and moved swiftly to enact the Penal Laws. It came to mind yesterday as Mary Lou McDonald dusted down "Perfidious Albion" in denunciation of the clear flouting of an international treaty concluded last October and put into international law this past January.


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