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This crisis shows modern Ireland adapting to become its own hero

Conor Skehan


In this crisis we are showing this is a country capable of acting for the common good and changing for the better

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LINK TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD: Postwoman Bernie Ronan delivers vital services such as mail to farmer Con Foott who lives in Robert’s Cove, Co Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision

LINK TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD: Postwoman Bernie Ronan delivers vital services such as mail to farmer Con Foott who lives in Robert’s Cove, Co Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision

LINK TO THE OUTSIDE WORLD: Postwoman Bernie Ronan delivers vital services such as mail to farmer Con Foott who lives in Robert’s Cove, Co Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney/Provision

Our response to Covid-19 offers an opportunity for Ireland to be its own hero. This crisis is an accelerant for recently emerging successful changes in our society. If we eventually succeed in managing this crisis well, then we must not lose sight of the reality that it will be an achievement by us all.

Already, 4.8m people are successfully adjusting to the loss of jobs as well as restricted family contact and socialising without significant protest or disagreement. There are no troops on the streets with loudspeakers in Ireland; they are not needed. We are doing this for ourselves and for each other, without much fuss. We are a good people.

This success has not emerged out of the blue. It has been part of a distinctive, emerging pattern of many successful, small steps in new directions that we have recently chosen for ourselves. We were ahead of most of Europe when we all agreed to avoid plastic bags; to accept the smoking ban and to change ourselves with our referendums.